Adam Robinson during the 1.6-km bikejor race. Robinson won the 1.6-km race and finished second in the 3.2-km bikejor race. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)

Hot Hound races conclude at Takhini hot springs

“The canicross seems to grow in popularity because you can just come (with) one dog — a pet dog”

The Dog Powered Sports Association of the Yukon (DPSAY) held its fourth and final Hot Hound race of the summer at the Takhini hot springs on Sept. 16.

Eight racers took part in the two bikejor races and 11 racers completed the canicross race.

In the 1.6-kilometre bikejor, Adam Robinson finished first with a time of five minutes and 50 seconds. Armin Johnson was second with a time of seven minutes and 54 seconds while Lisa Kozakewich was third in eight minutes and 22 seconds.

Alex Rochat won the 3.2-km bikejor with a time of 10 minutes and 13 seconds, followed by Robinson with a time of 10 minutes and 32 seconds and Johnson with a time of 10 minutes and 44 seconds.

In the 1.6-km canicross, Kyle Lavore was first with a time of eight minutes and 39 seconds. Robinson was second in eight minutes and 55 seconds, and Abel Semoussa and Gwenael Sinquin tied for third with a time of nine minutes flat.

Organizer Simi Morrison said the turnout was good, especially for the canicross.

“We had 11 canicross people, so that was great,” said Morrison. “The canicross seems to grow in popularity because you can just come (with) one dog — a pet dog. You don’t need necessarily a sled dog team.”

Prior to the race, DPSAY held a poker run to raise money for the Mae Bachur Animal Shelter.

“We did that last year as well at the Chadburn Lake trails,” said Morrison. “This year we chose Takhini hot springs. It was in the back — there is a really nice trail system — so it was a simple (1.6-km) loop with nice wide trail.”

Morrison said the run also included some participants without dogs just looking to help raise money for the shelter.

The poker run raised $500 in total.

Although there may be some good weather still to come, Morrison said October is too unreliable to schedule another Hot Hound race.

“Most of the time it’s too wet or already snowy and icy so it’s not safe for the bikejorers anymore,” said Morrison. “We look to put on workshops and do some educational stuff instead.”

Details for exactly what DPSAY has in store this autumn are still up in the air, as is the start of the Twister series of dog sled races.

“In the past we’ve started at the end of November because we’ve always had enough snow in the higher areas,” said Morrison. “The last years, we’ve always had to postpone it to the beginning or middle of December.”

If the weather cooperates, the racing could start at the traditional time.

“Maybe we’ll have a good winter,” said Morrison. “We just need snow.”

Contact John Hopkins-Hill at john.hopkinshill@yukon-news.com

Hot Hound Race Four Results

1.6-km bikejor

1 Adam Robinson 05:50

2 Armin Johnson 07:54

3 Lisa Kozakewich 08:22

4 Syvanna Schmidt 08:49

5 Jessica Gillard 13:26

3.2-km bikejor

1 Alex Rochat 10:13

2 Adam Robinson 10:32

3 Armin Johnson 10:44

4 Nadele Flynn 12:44

5 Heather Robb 12:46

1.6-km canicross

1 Kyle Lavore 08:39

2 Adam Robinson 08:55

T3 Abel Semoussa 09:00

T3 Gwenael Sinquin 09:00

5 Brad Robinson 09:07

6 Berenike Ziemert 09:59

7 Claudia Beer 11:30

8 Ombeline Girault 12:06

9 Eugenie Champeval 13:52

10 Shari Heal 14:57

11 Syvanna Schmidt 15:23

 

Armin Johnson during the 1.6-km race. Johnson placed second. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)

Just Posted

A high streamflow advisory has been issued for the Nordenskiold and Klondike Rivers on May 11. Photo by Yukon Protective Services
Nordenskiold, Klondike rivers see rising water levels; advisory issued

Following the river-ice breakup, flows have continued to rise on Nordenskiold and Klondike River systems, said a release by the Emergency Measures Organization.

Tuja Dreyer, of the Ross River Dena Council, won the 2020 Premier’s Awards for Indigenous Youth Excellence in Sports. (Photo by Doris Dreyer)
Tuja Dreyer wins 2020 Premier’s Awards for Indigenous Youth Excellence in Sports

Tuja Dreyer, of the Ross River Dena Council, is one of six athletes to win the award

Mike Thomas/Yukon News file
A fox runs across the street at Main Street and Third Avenue.
A new project seeks to learn more about Whitehorse fox populations

A new project to monitor and improve the understanding of urban foxes living in Whitehorse will begin this year

The Fireweed Market in Shipyards Park will open on May 13. Joel Krahn/Yukon News
Whitehorse’s Fireweed Market opens May 13

The Fireweed Market will return with ‘exciting’ new and returning vendors

Ron Rousseau holds a sign saying ‘It’s time for a cultural shift’ during the Yukoners: Raise Your Voice Against Misogyny rally on May 11. (John Tonin/Yukon News)
Protest held to condemn Yukon Party MLAs’ texts

A rally was held outside of legislature to condemn the inappropriate texts messages of Yukon Party MLAs Stacey Hassard and Wade Istchenko.

Drilling at Northern Tiger’s 3Ace gold project in 2011. Randi Newton argues that mining in the territory can be reshaped. (Yukon government/file)
Editorial: There’s momentum for mining reform

CPAWS’ Randi Newton argues that the territory’s mining legislations need a substantial overhaul

At its May 10 meeting, Whitehorse city council approved the subdivision for the Kwanlin Dün First Nation’s business park planned in Marwell. (Submitted)
KDFN business park subdivision approved

Will mean more commercial industrial land available in Whitehorse

Main Street in Whitehorse on May 4. Whitehorse city council has passed the first two readings of a bylaw to allow pop-up patios in city parking spaces. Third reading will come forward later in May. (Stephanie Waddell/Yukon News)
Whitehorse council pursuing restaurant patio possibilities

Council passes first two readings for new patio bylaw

Neil Hartling, the Tourism Industry Association of the Yukon president, left, said the new self-isolation guidelines for the Yukon are a ‘ray of hope’ for tourism operators. (Ian Stewart/Yukon News file)
Yukon tourism operators prepared for ‘very poor summer’ even with relaxed border rules

Toursim industry responds to new guidelines allowing fully vaccinated individuals to skip mandatory self-isolation.

A lawsuit has been filed detailing the resignation of a former Yukon government mine engineer. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
A year after resigning, former chief mine engineer sues Yukon government

Paul Christman alleges a hostile work environment and circumvention of his authority led him to quit

Former Liberal MLA Pauline Frost speaks to reporters outside the courthouse on April 19. One of the voters accused of casting an invalid vote has been granted intervenor status in the lawsuit Frost filed last month. (Haley Ritchie/Yukon News)
Voters named in Pauline Frost election lawsuit ask to join court proceedings

The judge granted Christopher Schafer intervenor status

Haley Ritchie/Yukon News file
File photo of the legislative assembly. The previous spring sitting began on March 4 but was interrupted due to the election.
Throne speech kicks off short spring legislature sitting

The government will now need to pass the budget.

Most Read