Bikers jump into summer

After years of planning, countless man-hours and tens of thousands spent, the bicycle skills park at Mt. McIntyre has reached completion - at least in terms of shovels, hammers and nails.

After years of planning, countless man-hours and tens of thousands spent, the bicycle skills park at Mt. McIntyre has reached completion – at least in terms of shovels, hammers and nails.

While mountain bikers and BMXers can now ride on the completed park – free of charge – it still needs a name.

“The Name the Park (contest) is still going on, so names can still be dropped off at Icycle Sports,” said Contagious Mountain Bike Club president Devon McDiarmid. “At the opening ceremony we will unveil the name.

“A panel will pick the name.”

However, that leads to another matter. An opening celebration is also in the plans – and will probably take place in July – but no date has been firmed up yet.

Construction of the park began last year with the erection of various dirt apparatuses, such as a pump-track and dirt jumps, which held up well over the winter months, said McDiarmid.

“The good thing about them is they held up really well over the last year,” he said. “So that was a good sign, as far as design, materials – there was very little erosion.

“The pump-track held up really well too. It’s been a favourite of everyone riding up there.

“We tried to use the existing ground as much as possible – we tried to use the lay of the land as much as possible as well,” added McDiarmid. “We tried to keep as many trees in as possible – at actually looks really nice.”

The finishing touches have been applied over the last few weeks with the installation of the wooden structures. Skinnies, teeter-toters, long rides, a drop zone, and a 20-foot wall ride are just some of the apparatuses that can now be enjoyed.

The skills park, which was the brainchild of the Contagious Mountain Bike Club and the Yukon Cycling Association, was designed by Jay Hoots, owner of the BC-based company Hoots Inc., a mountain bike clothing and safety equipment manufacturer.

Hoots, a mountain bike coach and professional rider, has built more than 24 community skills parks through out North America and is a member of such organizations as the North Shore Mountain Bike Association and the International Mountain Bicycling Association.

Under the guidance of Hoots, the skills park has been built to International Mountain Bicycling Association standards and offers activities for all levels of cyclist.

“We have everything for beginner beginners, so wooden ladders on the ground – like wooden bridges,” said McDiarmid. “There’s a cool little rock feature, which builds your skills to turn left or right on rocks. And they’re all graduated from easy to hard.

“Everything is built so you can progress – it’s a progression park. So if you’re a beginner, there’s stuff for you, but as you get better, there’s stuff to move on to.

“It’s quite a substantial park.”

The park received financial support from the city of Whitehorse and local sponsors – a total of which is still being calculated – but construction cost were kept below the estimated $80,000 cost thanks to volunteer efforts.

“I don’t know exactly how much money went into it,” said McDiarmid. “If we had to pay for everything, it would be well into the $100,000 range. But because of the sponsorships, the volunteer work and everything, we were able to keep it down to, probably, $50,000 to $60,000.

“The city of Whitehorse was a huge supporter.”

Contact Tom Patrick at

tomp@yukon-news.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Yukonomist Keith Halliday
Yukonomist: Are they coming?

One of COVID-19’s big economic questions is whether it will prompt a… Continue reading

Yukon MP Larry Bagnell, along with Yukon health and education delegates, announce a new medical research initiative via a Zoom conference on Jan. 21. (Screen shot)
New medical research unit at Yukon University launched

The SPOR SUPPORT Unit will implement patient-first research practices

Yukon First Nation Education Directorate members Bill Bennett, community engagement coordinator and Mobile Therapeutic Unit team lead, left, and Katherine Alexander, director of policy and analytics, speak to the News about the Mobile Therapeutic Unit that will provide education and health support to students in the communities. (yfned.ca)
Mobile Therapeutic Unit will bring education, health support to Indigenous rural students

The mobile unit will begin travelling to communities in the coming weeks

Premier Sandy Silver, left, and Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley, speak during a live stream in Whitehorse on January 20, about the new swish and gargle COVID-19 tests. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)
Swish and spit COVID-19 test now available in Yukon

Vaccination efforts continue in Whitehorse and smaller communities in the territory

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment in Faro photgraphed in 2016. Faro will receive a new RCMP detachment in 2022, replacing the decades-old building currently accommodating officers. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
Faro RCMP tagged for new detachment

Faro will receive a new RCMP detachment in 2022, replacing the decades-old… Continue reading

In a Jan. 18 announcement, the Yukon government said the shingles vaccine is now being publicly funded for Yukoners between age 65 and 70, while the HPV vaccine program has been expanded to all Yukoners up to and including age 26. (1213rf.com)
Changes made to shingles, HPV vaccine programs

Pharmacists in the Yukon can now provide the shingles vaccine and the… Continue reading

Parking attendant Const. Ouellet puts a parking ticket on the windshield of a vehicle in downtown Whitehorse on Dec. 6, 2018. The City of Whitehorse is hoping to write of nearly $300,000 in outstanding fees, bylaw fines and court fees, $20,225 of which is attributed to parking fines issued to non-Yukon license plates. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
City of Whitehorse could write off nearly $300,000

The City of Whitehorse could write off $294,345 in outstanding fees, bylaw… Continue reading

Grants available to address gender-based violence

Organizations could receive up to $200,000

In this illustration, artist-journalist Charles Fripp reveals the human side of tragedy on the Stikine trail to the Klondike in 1898. A man chases his partner around the tent with an axe, while a third man follows, attempting to intervene. (The Daily Graphic/July 27, 1898)
History Hunter: Charles Fripp — gold rush artist

The Alaskan coastal town of Wrangell was ill-equipped for the tide of… Continue reading

A man walks passed the polling place sign at city hall in Whitehorse on Oct. 18, 2018. While Whitehorse Mayor Dan Curtis is now setting his sights on the upcoming territorial election, other members of council are still pondering their election plans for the coming year. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Councillors undecided on election plans

Municipal vote set for Oct. 21

Whitehorse City Hall. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
City hall, briefly

A look at decicions made by Whitehorse city council this week.

A file photo of grizzly bear along the highway outside Dawson City. Yukon conservation officers euthanized a grizzly bear Jan. 15 that was originally sighted near Braeburn. (Alistair Maitland/Yukon News file)
Male grizzly euthanized near Braeburn

Yukon conservation officers have euthanized a grizzly bear that was originally sighted… Continue reading

Most Read