TIMELINE: 15 years of Peel planning

The signing of the final plan for the Peel marks the end of 15 years of planning — and court fights

October 2004

Land use planning begins for the Peel region, an area in northern Yukon that is approximately 68,000 square kilometres. The planning commission was made up of members nominated by both the Yukon government and the impacted First Nations.

July 2011

The Peel Watershed Planning Commission releases the Final Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan. It recommends protecting 80 per cent of the region from development.

January 2014

The Yukon Party government releases a Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan that differs significantly from the commission’s final recommended plan. Only 29 per cent of the region is protected from development.

January 2014

The same week the government releases its plan, First Nations and environmental groups announce plans to take the Yukon government to court arguing that such a dramatic change does not follow the planning process set out in Chapter 11 of the First Nations’ final agreements. They are represented by pioneering Aboriginal law expert Thomas Berger.

December 2014

Yukon Supreme Court Justice Ron Veale rules that the Yukon government violated the process. He sends everyone back to the final round of consultations but rules the government can only make minor changes to the Final Recommended Plan.

December 2014

The Yukon Party government announces plans to appeal Veale’s decision. Government lawyers argue the Yukon government should retain the authority to make final decisions on public lands.

November 2015

The Yukon Court of Appeal agrees that the Yukon government did not properly follow the process set out in the final agreements but rules the government can go back to an earlier stage of consultation to modify the plan more significantly.

December 2015

First Nations and environmental groups apply to have their appeal heard in the Supreme Court of Canada. They say the court of appeal incorrectly gave the Yukon government a “do-over.”

November 2016

Yukon Liberals win a majority government in the territorial election. The Liberals’ election platform included a promise to implement the Final Recommended Plan.

March 2017

The Supreme Court of Canada hears the Peel case in Ottawa.

December 2017

The Supreme Court of Canada rules in favour of the First Nations. The country’s top judges say the Yukon government can only make minor changes and does not have the authority to “change the Final Recommended Plan so significantly as to effectively reject it.” Premier Sandy Silver promises the Final Recommended Plan will only be “tweaked” and that no changes will come from his government.

September 2018

Liberals begin a final round of consultations. By the end, officials say they received more than 2,000 responses.

August 2019

The final Peel plan is signed by Silver and leaders of the affected First Nations. It includes various levels of protection for 83 per cent of the region.

Just Posted

Yukon’s Japanese association launches its first sake festival

Former president says the hope is to bring people together to learn

Yukon First Nations, AFN Yukon, CYFN sign climate change emergency declaration

The declaration was signed on the last day of the Yukon First Nations Climate Action Gathering

Yukon Fish and Game Association opposed to moose management proposals

Executive director Eric Schroff said he thinks Yukon government needs to be more transparent

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

Casino taking more time with mine proposal

Statement not expected to be submitted to YESAB until Dec. 31, 2021

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in to hold general election in April

On top of voting for chief, three councillors, citizens will vote for a deputy chief for first time

Yukon’s minimum wage set to increase by $1 to $13.71 in April

The increase will make the Yukon’s minimum wage the fourth-highest in the country

City news, briefly

Some of the decisions made at the Whitehorse council meeting on Feb 17

Yukonomist: Three questions on Yukon Zinc and China

The case heard recently in Yukon Supreme Court is particularly troubling

Commentary: Highway plans will negatively impact safety

The proposed Alaska Highway work will impact our safety, our communities and our environment.

Olivia Webster is the final musher to finish the Yukon Quest

‘I guess I’ve always been a grandpa’s girl and he’s my best friend, so I kind of wanted to be like him and so I did it’

Yukon’s Rob Cooke and company finish 10th in the 2020 Yukon Quest

Cooke and his 14 Siberians crossed the finish line at 9:07 a.m. on Feb. 15 in Whitehorse

Lights Out Yukon Invitational Basketball Tournament bigger than ever in sixth year

“Honestly, it was the smoothest tournament I think we’ve run yet”

Most Read