Taylor to resign from bylaw

City bylaw manager John Taylor is retiring for a second time. Taylor, who joined the city bylaw department 12 years ago, has decided to step back from his position indefinitely. "I had a hell of a good career," said Taylor, who is nearing 60.

City bylaw manager John Taylor is retiring for a second time.

Taylor, who joined the city bylaw department 12 years ago, has decided to step back from his position indefinitely.

“I had a hell of a good career,” said Taylor, who is nearing 60.

“But it’s time for me to get onto my third career in life – retirement.”

Taylor spent 26 years as an RCMP officer, spending much of that time stationed in Dawson City.

When he was 48, he was supposed to be rotated south to another post in Canada.

But rather than move, Taylor retired from being an officer so that he could stay in the Yukon.

“I didn’t want to leave; I really liked it here,” he said.

When the position as bylaw manager opened up at the city, he couldn’t resist applying for the job since it seemed like a natural segue from his work as an officer.

But with no previous experience working in municipal governments, Taylor had to shift his mindset.

“I felt it was a tremendous learning experience,” said Taylor.

“The RCMP is a big organization, whereas the city is very personal, so it was very enjoyable that way.”

Taylor admits, however, the public’s attitude toward bylaw officers isn’t always favourable.

“Any time you tell someone they can’t do something, they don’t like it,” he said.

“But if you treat people with respect, they’ll treat you back with respect.”

Taylor spent much of his time on the job drafting and re-writing bylaws.

And every bylaw that came across his desk was important, right down to the phone calls about icy sidewalks, he said.

But some stand out, like the city’s controversial smoking bylaw introduced in 2003 before the territory turned it into legislation. And there’s also the animal protection and vehicle-for-hire bylaws. The latter is currently up for review.

Taylor still has a couple more projects to finish up before he officially retires at the end of June, he said.

Then he and his wife plan to move down to Vancouver where they already have a retirement home lined up.

That’s where he’ll focus on his next assignments – golfing and fishing. (Vivian Belik)

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