Crystal Schick/Yukon News file Dr. Brendan Hanley, the Yukon’s chief medical officer of health. Hanley is warning that potentially lethal heroin could be in the territory.

Tainted heroin could be in the Yukon, says chief medical officer

‘It would completely reasonable to expect that it might be here’

Potentially lethal heroin laced with fentanyl or carfentanil may be in the Yukon, according to Chief Medical Officer Dr. Brendan Hanley.

The drug cocktail is called “purple heroin” after its colour.

“We just know it’s in the country and that there are anecdotes of there being some kind of a powerful heroin product being around (in the Yukon),” Hanley said.

“We think it might be purple heroin. It would completely reasonable to expect that it might be here because we know that drugs that are elsewhere do find their way into the community.”

Hanley warns Yukoners to be extra cautious. This could mean running heroin through a test offered by Blood Ties Four Directions.

“We’ve heard of recent overdoses that have been thought to be associated with heroin,” he said.

In a written statement, Yukon RCMP spokesperson Coralee Reid said that while most heroin seized is brown, some has been purple and pink. Fentanyl has been detected in these batches, she said.

“We’ve responded to calls for service where people have shown signs of overdose and/or been ill after consuming what is believed to be purple heroin, but this has not been confirmed through testing at this point,” she said, noting that over a 12-month period, officers used naloxone on 17 people.

Illicit drugs enter the territory through crime syndicates in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario, Reid said.

There have been no suspected or confirmed opioid overdose deaths this year, Hanley said.

“We put this out quickly, even though we don’t have a lot of detailed information on what’s going on, because we thought people need to know this might be present,” he said.

“We’re just gonna remain very vigilant about this and get whatever intel we can.”

Contact Julien Gignac at julien.gignac@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Yukon government was wrong in evicting youth from a group home, commissioner finds

The health department has roughly two months to respond to recommendations

Stephanie Dixon ready to dive into new role as chef de mission for 2019 Parapan American Games and 2020 Paralympic Games

“You do it because you believe in yourself and you have people around you that believe in you”

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

Whitehorse becomes first community north of 60 to have private pot shop

Triple J’s Canna Space opens its doors to first customers

Whitehorse council news, briefly

Some of the news that came out of Whitehorse city council this week

Snowmobiles and snow bikes descend on Mount Sima for Yukon Yamaha Uphill Challenge

“I think everyone had their eyes opened on what could be done there”

Yukon Orienteering Association starts Coast Mountain Sports Sprint Series off in the right direction

The race on April 11 was the first of five sprint races planned for the spring

Yukon gymnasts stick the landing at inaugural B.C. Junior Olympic Compulsory Championships

Seven Polarettes earned five podium finishes at the two-day event in Langley, B.C.

École Émilie-Tremblay hosts first Yukon elementary school wrestling meet of 2019

“You can grab kids and you can trip and you can do that rough play, but there are rules”

Driving with Jens: Survey says….

If you’re like me, you probably feel inundated with surveys. It seems… Continue reading

Editorial: Promising electoral reform is the easy part

Details of what that would actually look like are much harder to come by

Yukonomist: The centre of the business universe moves 4,000 k.m. northwest

The Canadian Federation of Independent Business named Whitehorse Canada’s top place to start and grow a business

Whitehorse starts getting ready for Japanese students

This summer 13 Japanese students are slated to come north

Most Read