Fentie unilaterally appoints YUB chair

Utilities Fentie unilaterally appoints YUB chair Premier Dennis Fentie has appointed a Yukon Utilities' Board chair without consulting the appropriate legislative committee.

Premier Dennis Fentie has appointed a Yukon Utilities’ Board chair without consulting the appropriate legislative committee.

“The issue is about democracy,” said Don Inverarity, the Liberal MLA for Porter Creek South and a member of the standing committee on major appointments to boards and committees.

“(The committee) shouldn’t be arbitrarily abandoned,” said Inverarity.

Last month, Fentie simply told the leaders of the Liberal and New Democratic parties that Bruce McLennan, a former deputy minister at the Yukon’s finance department, would be the board’s new chair. The appointment was rushed to expedite hearings on the Mayo dam’s expansion project.

But there was plenty of time to have the committee chair, Yukon Party MLA Elaine Taylor, call the members together, said Inverarity.

Wendy Shanks resigned as chair in December, a year early.

“There was lots of time for appointing people who might have been interested in this in December and January,” said Inverarity.

“The committee just isn’t important to (the government.)”

The committee, which usually sits outside of normal legislature sittings, would have reviewed McLennan’s resume and compared it to other possible candidates, he said.

McLennan no longer lives in the Yukon.

“If you’re looking at our utility rates, it would be nice if (the board chair) could share the pain,” said Inverarity.

The government has a pattern of circumventing the appointment process, he said.

Fentie didn’t let the committee vet his appointments to the Yukon Development Corporation’s board last fall.

He also reappointed Workers’ Compensation Health and Safety Board chair Craig Tuton without asking the committee two years ago.

“Every time he does this, it chips away at our government,” said Inverarity.

Four appointments to the Yukon Energy Corporation’s board are expected in the spring.

Any appointment to major boards and committees are required to go through the legislative committee, according to the Yukon legislature’s standing orders.

Just Posted

Greyhound’s plans to axe B.C., Yukon bus routes get approved

Company says B.C. services have lost $70M over last decade

YG slow to reveal tender info for new public contracts

Work will be exempt from national free-trade rules

Plenty of Yukon talent in KIJHL playoffs

8 Yukoners playing on teams in the big dance

How suite it is: Whitehorse council mulls amendment to allow suites where they’re currently banned

Coun. Dan Boyd fears move a slippery slope to more affordable housing

No Resource Gateway construction work this season, YG says

‘We’re not as advanced as we would have liked to have been but we still are advancing’

Man who sexually abused girls a good candidate for treatment, eventual release, psychiatrist says

Dr. Shabreham Lohrasbe is an expert witness in the dangerous offender hearing for the man

Robots don’t rule over us yet, but they do sell lunch

Not everyone will be taken into the future, as Ilya Kabakov once said

YG seeks to ease neighbourhood concerns over housing first project

YG will consult more once design for downtown building is complete

Yukon skiers race to victory at Sima Cup

‘The snow conditions, the visibility and the grooming were out of the ordinary’

Cold weather hampers Babe Southwick Memorial Race

‘It was nice to see people out there because we didn’t expect as many volunteers to show up’

Yukon war memorial hidden in Vancouver

A dramatic and beautiful memorial to the fallen of World War I is not well known to Yukoners today

Of ravens, eagles, livers and lead

Environment Yukon’s animal health unit has been testing livers of scavenging birds since 2013

Most Read