Contractor picked to build new continuing care centre

The Yukon government has picked a contractor to design and build the new 150-bed continuing care facility in Whistle Bend. 

The Yukon government has picked a contractor to design and build the new 150-bed continuing care facility in Whistle Bend.

The government issued a news release late yesterday announcing it had chosen PCL Constructors Westcoast Inc. with its partners CEI Architecture and Derek Crawford Architect Inc. as the preferred proponents to handle the build.

PCL is the same company that is currently working on the expansion of the Whitehorse General Hospital. It is based out of Richmond, B.C.

The two architectural companies are also from B.C.

The government will negotiate with PCL to settle the final terms of the design-build agreement, the news release said.

The contract is expected in the new year. Construction will begin in early 2016, with a target completion date of mid-2018.

A networking session will be held to connect local contractors and service providers with the design-build team, the government says.

The project is moving forward despite vocal complaints from many people, including the Official Opposition, who say a big facility out in the sparsely developed Whistle Bend neighbourhood is not in the territory’s best interest.

The government has always insisted that such a centre is needed.

“We’ve heard from Yukoners and our health care professionals that this continuing care facility is urgently needed,” said Health and Social Services Minister Mike Nixon in the press release.

“We are excited to move forward on this facility. It embraces best practices based on informed evidence from across the nation, and is designed with a lens that encompasses aging and dementia care. With this facility, Yukon will continue to be a national leader in providing a broad continuum of services to seniors.”

The project is expected to cost about $158 million, but the final figure won’t be announced until a contract is signed, the government said.

Just Posted

Yukon parents, educators tackling learning at home amid a world pandemic

Yukon teachers will be assessing how to deliver education over the coming months

Whitehorse could soon see a local tool library

Proposed venture aims to give member access to tools without needing to buy them

Fifth COVID-19 case hits the Yukon

An individual tested positive over the weekend

UPDATED: Yukon declares state of emergency over COVID-19

Declaration should not cause panic, officials say, and risk level in Yukon remains unchanged

Yukon early childhood educators concerned about working during pandemic

Early childhood educator has circulated letter expressing concerns about care centres remaining open

Victoria Gold still operating Eagle Gold mine with COVID-19 precautions in place

The mine is still in operation but with precautions, including social distancing, in place

YTA, Yukon government reach agreement on hiring dispute out of court

YTA’s petition was set to be heard March 25 but was called off after the parties reached an agreement

City hall, briefly

Here’s a look at issues discussed by Whitehorse city council at its… Continue reading

Skagway has resolve in the COVID-19 struggle, mayor says

Skagway mayor said border access is important for residents.

Yukonomist: Steering your business through COVID-19

While “proofing” your business against the impacts might not be possible, being prepared is.

History Hunter: How the Yukon was spared the influenza pandemic of 1918

The isolation of the Yukon then afford the territory some protection that it doesn’t have today

Whitehorse city council contemplates OCP change for section of the tank farm

Change would allow for commercial industrial use instead of current residential classification

Truck slides off Dempster Highway

The truck left the road around 4 p.m. on March 19. The highway was closed until March 21 for cleanup.

Most Read