Bob Dickson speaks to media about a report on First Nation students on June 20. Dickson will remain as Kluane First Nation’s chief for a second term after being acclaimed on Aug. 23. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)

Bob Dickson gets second term as Kluane First Nation chief

Bob Dickson acclaimed for second term

Kluane First Nation Chief Bob Dickson will remain chief for a second term after being acclaimed in the First Nation’s Aug. 23 vote for chief and council.

Elected to the two positions of councillors-at-large were Kathleen Johnson with 65 votes and incumbent Christabelle Carlick with 61 votes. Curtis Carlick had also sought a seat on council and received 48 votes.

Nominated to the role of youth councillor was Colesen Ford.

The position of elder’s councillor was not filled; though Dickson said in an Aug. 27 interview the spot will be filled in the coming weeks.

Dickson said his desire to see projects underway come to fruition made him want to serve another term as chief.

The new council has yet to meet and discuss its strategic plan which will set out priorities for the three-year term, but Dickson said he would like the First Nation to continue focusing on the building of a new water plant and the continued push for a school in Burwash Landing.

“We want to build our community,” he said, stressing the importance of a school in keeping families in the area.

Many move to Whitehorse or Haines Junction so their kids can attend school there. Once they move, it’s difficult to draw them back.

Along with the school, there’s other infrastructure projects Dickson envisions, which he believes could help build the capacity — a new administrative building and health centre in Burwash Landing for example.

“I want to see something happen here,” he said. “We need to build capacity in the community so we can keep our citizens.”

Dickson said language is an important focus for the First Nation as officials work towards developing its new language department aimed at preserving and revitalizing the Southern Tutchone language. Until now, language initiatives have come under the broader department of Lands, Resources and Heritage. The new department will specifically deal with language through learning programs and other initiatives. Among those are a plan that will see street signs in Southern Tutchone.

Contact Stephanie Waddell at stephanie.waddell@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

UPDATED: Yukon declares state of emergency over COVID-19

Declaration should not cause panic, officials say, and risk level in Yukon remains unchanged

Yukon early childhood educators concerned about working during pandemic

Early childhood educator has circulated letter expressing concerns about care centres remaining open

YG rolls out relief measures for businesses, tenants

Employers now can recoup costs for sick leave they’ve paid out

Victoria Gold still operating Eagle Gold mine with COVID-19 precautions in place

The mine is still in operation but with precautions, including social distancing, in place

YTA, Yukon government reach agreement on hiring dispute out of court

YTA’s petition was set to be heard March 25 but was called off after the parties reached an agreement

City hall, briefly

Here’s a look at issues discussed by Whitehorse city council at its… Continue reading

Skagway has resolve in the COVID-19 struggle, mayor says

Skagway mayor said border access is important for residents.

Yukonomist: Steering your business through COVID-19

While “proofing” your business against the impacts might not be possible, being prepared is.

History Hunter: How the Yukon was spared the influenza pandemic of 1918

The isolation of the Yukon then afford the territory some protection that it doesn’t have today

Whitehorse city council contemplates OCP change for section of the tank farm

Change would allow for commercial industrial use instead of current residential classification

Truck slides off Dempster Highway

The truck left the road around 4 p.m. on March 19. The highway was closed until March 21 for cleanup.

Most Read