Patricia Bacon, Blood Ties executive director, talked to city council Dec. 4 about placing five tiny homes on a lot which the organization purchased on Sixth Avenue in October, to create permanent housing for its clients. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)

Blood Ties Four Directions eyes tiny home project for Whitehorse

‘It’s designed to feel like a community’

Blood Ties Four Directions wants the City of Whitehorse to approve rezoning of a property at Sixth Avenue and Jarvis Street for a planned tiny home project for vulnerable people.

The not-for-profit, which purchased a lot at 6140 Sixth Avenue in October, wants to place five tiny homes on the property to create permanent housing for its clients, who often experience homelessness, poverty and health issues. The lot is currently zoned for a maximum of four tiny houses.

Blood Ties Four Directions advocates for and supports people in the community with HIV, AIDS or Hepatitis C.

“Our clients tend to be displaced from housing and excluded from the rental market,” said Blood Ties executive director Patricia Bacon. “The goal of the (project) is to simplify clients’ lives and allow them to live in comfort and dignity.”

According to a 2017 survey, Bacon said, 256 people in Whitehorse experience or are at risk of homelessness. Of those people, 44 are “absolutely homeless and living on the street.”

Bacon said that rezoning the property to allow five units would create “better economies of scale” for the project. The units will be rented at a subsidized rate, and having the fifth unit means Blood Ties can pay back the $200,000 loan it took out to purchase the property faster, while still allowing for the “financial wiggle-room” to pay for services and upkeep of the properties.

Blood Ties is also seeking that the city waive a requirement that new multi-unit developments in the neighborhood have class one bicycle parking, which would mean building bike storage into each of the individual units, she said. This is simply not practical, she said, for tiny homes where space is at a premium.

“This is a little different than a large-scale condo development,” said Coun. Roslyn Woodcock. “So maybe (the bike parking) is something we can let go.”

Coun. Dan Boyd was concerned that rezoning and waiving bike parking requirements might “set a precedent for the neighborhood” for future development.

Mike Ellis, the city’s senior planner, said “each amendment is decided on a case-by-case basis and (the city) does not consider precedents,” when making these decisions.

The project comes out of an earlier, successful single-unit tiny home run by Blood Ties, the Steve Cardiff house. That tiny home was on a lot owned by a developer between 2012 and 2016, until the owner asked that the tiny home be moved so he could build on the lot. The organization was unable to find another home for the Steve Cardiff house, and put it into storage, where it has been ever since, said Bacon.

“Our vision for the lot is to move the Steve Cardiff house to the lot … and complement it with four similar units,” Bacon said. “It’s designed to feel like a community.”

Clients originally lived in the Steve Cardiff house for up to one year. But in the new project clients will now be able to stay in the tiny homes “for as long as the program works for them,” Bacon said.

Bacon told councillors the reason Blood Ties removed the one-year cap was to take pressure off clients, many of whom have health issues which take time to resolve. This “is the best way to support vulnerable people,” she said.

“For many of our clients, their health needs are so great that just getting them stabilized takes more than a year.”

In an interview, Bacon said the project will be truly housing-first, meaning clients are not required to be sober as a condition getting housing.

“I’m really excited about the whole concept,” said Coun. Betty Irwin. “It’s a shame it will only take five people off the street…. Many people cannot afford the high rents in this city.”

Council will give the rezoning a first reading at the Dec. 11 meeting. If passed, it will receive a public hearing Jan. 15, 2018, with a final vote Jan. 29.

Contact Lori Fox at lori.fox@yukon-news.com

HomelessnessHousing MarketWhitehorse city council

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Benjamin Poudou, Mount MacIntyre’s ski club manager, poses for a photo in the club’s ski rental area on Nov. 16. The club has sold around 1,850 passes already this year, compared to 1067 passes on Oct. 31 last year. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)
Early season ski pass sales up as Yukoners prepare for pandemic winter

Season passe sales at Mount McIntyre for cross-country skiing are up by around 60 per cent this year

The City of Whitehorse will be spending $655,000 to upgrade the waste heat recovery system at the Canada Games Centre. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
New waste heat recovery system coming to the CGC

Council approves $655,000 project

Yukon First Nation Education Directorate education advocates and volunteers help to sort and distribute Christmas hamper grocery boxes outside Elijah Smith Elementary School on Feb. 23. (Rebecca Bradford Andrew/Submitted)
First Nation Education Directorate begins Christmas hamper program

Pick-ups for hampers are scheduled at local schools

Cyrine Candido, cashier, right, wipes down the new plexi-glass dividers at Superstore on March 28, before it was commonplace for them to wear masks. The Yukon government is relaunching the Yukon Essential Workers Income Support Program as the second wave of COVID-19 begins to take place in the territory. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Yukon Essential Workers Income Support Program extended to 32 weeks

More than 100 businesses in the territory applied for the first phase of the program

Cody Pederson of the CA Storm walks around LJ’s Sabres player Clay Plume during the ‘A’ division final of the 2019 Yukon Native Hockey Tournament. The 2021 Yukon Native Hockey Tournament, scheduled for March 25 to 28 in Whitehorse next year, was officially cancelled on Nov. 24 in a press release from organizers. (John Hopkins-Hill/Yukon News file)
2021 Yukon Native Hockey Tournament cancelled

The 2021 Yukon Native Hockey Tournament, scheduled for March 25 to 28… Continue reading

Lev Dolgachov/123rf
The Yukon’s Information and Privacy Commissioner stressed the need to safeguard personal information while shopping this holiday season in a press release on Nov. 24.
Information and Privacy Commissioner issues reminder about shopping

The Yukon’s Information and Privacy Commissioner Diane McLeod-McKay stressed the need to… Continue reading

Keith Lay speaks at a city council meeting on Dec. 4, 2017. Lay provided the lone submission to council on the city’s proposed $33 million capital spending plan for 2021 on Nov. 23, taking issue with a number of projects outlined. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Resident raises issues with city’s capital budget

Council to vote on budget in December

Beatrice Lorne was always remembered by gold rush veterans as the ‘Klondike Nightingale’. (Yukon Archives/Maggies Museum Collection)
History Hunter: Beatrice Lorne — The ‘Klondike Nightingale’

In June of 1929, 11 years after the end of the First… Continue reading

Samson Hartland is the executive director of the Yukon Chamber of Mines. The Yukon Chamber of Mines elected a new board of directors during its annual general meeting held virtually on Nov. 17. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
Yukon Chamber of Mines elects new board

The Yukon Chamber of Mines elected a new board of directors during… Continue reading

The Yukon Hospital Corporation has released its annual report for 2019-20, and — unsurprisingly — hospital visitations were down. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Annual report says COVID-19 had a large impact visitation numbers at Whitehorse General

The Yukon Hospital Corporation has released its annual report for 2019-20, and… Continue reading

Whitehorse City Hall. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
City hall, briefly

A look at decisions made by Whitehorse city council this week

Most Read