Letter to the Editor

Remembering “Mielsen” When I was a kid, I remember when Erik Nielsen first came up to Old Crow.

Remembering “Mielsen”

When I was a kid, I remember when Erik Nielsen first came up to Old Crow.

At that time, Old Crow was very isolated and few outsiders came here.

Everyone spoke Gwichin and Chief Charlie Abel was the interpreter for Nielsen. All our people spoke very highly of him and he took the time to meet all our people and listen to our concerns.

My grandmother (Didoo) couldn’t pronounce his name, and called him “Mielsen.”

Erik Nielsen really liked us and we really liked him. He did a lot for Old Crow and I would like to say a big “Mussi choo” to “Mielsen.”

My great-grandmother Margaret Blackfox made many walking trips to Herschel island to trade with the whalers. My dad, Special Constable Peter Benjamin, also made many RCMP dog team patrols to Herschel Island.

Erik Nielsen’s son Rick read my poems about my great Didoo and my dad, and last August he flew me up to Herschel Island to see their trails.

I would also like to thank Rick for flying me to Herschel Island to show me the trails.

Allan Benjamin

Old Crow

News slights Pasloski, extols some guy named Lewis

Open letter to Richard Mostyn re editorial Darrell Pasloski’s 15 minutes of fame (the News, September 17):

Obviously, the title reveals not only how much time Pasloski devoted to your interview, but also how much time the three of you (yourself, Genesee Keevil, and that young aspiring journalist who’s heading shortly to Argentina, I heard) have devoted to scribbling hastily this editorial.

By the way, wasn’t Keevil the lady who wrote the glorifying article about a drug pusher here in town, who bragged about his 20-plus-years “career” in drug pushing?

If you wonder who the heck I am, I’m the one who jokingly suggested that the young aspiring journalist should swap jobs with my daughter, who is the co-editor of a relatively big (bigger than Yukon News) paper in Guadalajara, Mexico.

That was before I knew who you were.

On a second thought, my daughter stands on a much higher moral ground than your triumvirate, since she has really espoused the most important rule in journalism: objectivity, and that has enabled her to write many, and on different topics, articles passionately, but always objectively.

I don’t think you have the right to claim that. Period.

What the three of you have in common, I think, is: You all think fondly of the safe-exchange needle program that promotes more drug usage; you all want to help the world at any cost (don’t we all); to you, money comes directly from the royal mint whenever you need it; you all give the same denigrating slant to everything shared sincerely with you by a differently thinking individual (small-town, oft-helpful pharmacist comes to mind) you all gloat and glorify like-minded people, and the small town, big-shot journalists that you are aspiring to be, declare the internationally reknown Stephen (who?) Lewis, “the hard act to follow.”

In other words, you came to Pasloski’s office not as objective, unbiased journalists, but like the hurricane Ike, hoping to leave enough destruction and debris behind. Smacks of Michael Moore tactics, where lies and truths are so enmeshed, that you stop believing even your mother.

So, is an obituary for the objective journalism at the Yukon News in order?

Very much so!

Chris Geshev

Whitehorse

Pasloski makes light

of serious issue

An open letter to Conservative candidate Darrell Pasloski:

I was very disappointed to hear you refer to the Liberal’s proposed carbon tax as “ridiculous.”

You want to represent us as MLA. I had hoped you would show some leadership.

I had hoped you would discuss the climate-change issue honestly and intelligently and tell us why the Conservative’s plan would be more effective.

In short, I had hoped you would do what’s best for Yukoners.

Instead, you have followed your party’s leadership in a cowardly and cynical attempt to cloud the issue and hope that voters will only remember “tax = bad” when it comes to voting day.

I do not know if a carbon tax is the best way for us to deal with climate change. It is, however, a serious policy that is being used in other countries and provinces to try to limit our carbon emissions and deserves more than just a casual dismissal.

To characterize it just as a tax grab is a blatant attempt to avoid any serious discussion of whether it would work. Not only that, but the analyses that I’ve seen suggest that most taxpayers would get back more in tax credits than they pay in carbon taxes.

Pasloski, if you don’t understand the carbon tax, then you should do more research so you can discuss it intelligently and tell us why the Conservative plan is better.

If you do understand it and you feel it’s more productive to just dismiss it as “ridiculous” than actually discuss the climate-change issue with Yukoners, then you don’t deserve to be our MLA.

Climate change is not just a “greenie” issue.

There is no longer any doubt that it is happening, that humans are largely responsible, and that it will have profound effects on our economy, on human health and well-being, and on our social systems as well as on the environment. It’s likely the biggest issue that our children will have to deal with in their lives.

We need leaders who will take real actions that get real results now.

The Conservative plan to date sets targets to reduce emissions over the long term, but provides no way for us to reach those. History shows us that setting targets without planning how to meet them is just empty words.

As I said, I don’t know how well the Liberal’s carbon tax would work. I don’t know who I’m going to vote for yet either.

I do know, though, that it will be for a candidate who is willing to address the issues that are most important with solid proposals and honesty, not with deception.

So, Pasloski, let’s show some leadership and integrity and do what’s right for Yukoners, not what you think will buy you votes.

Let’s have an open discussion about how the Conservative’s plan to deal with climate change will work.

Let’s debate how a carbon tax would work, not try to scare people away from even considering it.

Your campaign flyers show you with your family — let’s do what’s right for our children for a change.

Mark O’Donoghue

Mayo

Watson spotlight

appreciated

I would like to thank you for running the interviews of different members of the town by Tor Forsberg.  It really showcased Watson Lake in a positive light and was informative about people we see daily. I found them interesting, amusing and amazing. It would be great to see more of that type of information in the paper.

Cheryl O’Brien

Watson Lake

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