Justice delayed

Justice delayed It was discouraging to read your account of my ongoing battle with the Yukon branch of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada. Just as the prosecution used a police officer to prop up a weak case, your reporter enlisted a "domestic vio

It was discouraging to read your account of my ongoing battle with the Yukon branch of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada.

Just as the prosecution used a police officer to prop up a weak case, your reporter enlisted a “domestic violence researcher” to weigh in on a matter she knows nothing about.

After reviewing all of the evidence in my case, a panel of distinguished judges found that I did not receive a fair trial. They did so in spite of a very high presumption that the criminal justice system treats everyone fairly.

In May of 2011, the prosecution could have resolved an argument by way of a peace bond. Instead they elected to charge me with three serious offences, two of which were alleged to have occurred a year earlier.

For an accused person, the Domestic Violence Treatment Option court is more of an ultimatum than an option. I would have been required to immediately plead guilty to all of the false charges brought by the prosecution.

It is a rare occurrence for a higher court to set aside a jury verdict. Like it or not, the golden thread of a healthy criminal justice system is presumption of innocence and proof beyond a reasonable doubt. Anything less is a corrupt system.

John Kaswandik

Whitehorse