Edzera ‘was one of a kind’

Edzera 'was one of a kind' Re: Edzerza succumbs to cancer: I am writing to provide clarification to the article written by John Thompson on November 30. Regarding Edzerza's legacy of the Jackson Lake Healing Camp, it is NOT a camp for "alcoholics and dr

Re: Edzerza succumbs to cancer:

I am writing to provide clarification to the article written by John Thompson on November 30.

Regarding Edzerza’s legacy of the Jackson Lake Healing Camp, it is NOT a camp for “alcoholics and drug addicts.” Rather it is a healing camp for persons suffering with grief issues, residential school issues, family issues and substance abuse issues. The healing camp is open to all Yukoners.

John was never homeless!

In 1996 John took the two-week Community Addictions Training course offered at Jackson Lake by Nechi Institute of Alberta.

John’s first career was as a welder. In 1976 he met his wife Jennifer and through her love and support John turned his life around and began his sobriety walk. During this period both John and Jennifer transferred their citizenship/membership to Kwanlin Dun First Nation. John changed his lifestyle, eventually finding spirituality through Randall Tetlichi. Randall went on to build a sweatlodge on John and Jennifer’s property at Fish Lake.

John and Jennifer committed 12 years to fostering and caring for disturbed children, including acting as therapeutic parents. John sat on the Yukon Advisory Council on Indian Child Welfare for five years and was instrumental in making profound changes to how the department interacts with Yukon First Nation children today.

John’s political life began with Kwanlin Dun First Nation when he was elected in 1989 to council.

He then went on to work for KDFN as a family support worker and as an adult justice support worker.

At the age of 50 John went back to school to continue his studies on a bachelor’s degree in Social Work.

John was re-elected to KDFN council in 2000. For all intents and purposes, KDFN launched his political career.

John was truly one of a kind, warm yet straight-up, brutally honest and a caring human being. He will be deeply missed by the KDFN community and the Yukon at large.

John leaves behind his wife, Jennifer (although separated) and four children Ð Debbie, Jamie, Crystal and Warren and eight grandchildren.

All my relations,

Jacine Fox

Whitehorse