Breaking trail

Breaking trail I read the article by John Thompson in the September 9 paper, ATV Restrictions Popular: Poll, and just have to say a few things. Wow, 93 per cent support restricting ATVs in fragile wetlands and alpine meadows. Is that what the poll asked

I read the article by John Thompson in the September 9 paper, ATV Restrictions Popular: Poll, and just have to say a few things. Wow, 93 per cent support restricting ATVs in fragile wetlands and alpine meadows. Is that what the poll asked the small sampling of Yukoners?

This was determined by polling 275 Yukoners out of the whole population of 30,000? Amazing.

What you’re saying is that 256 people out of 30,000 are supporters, and the rest don’t count.

I wonder if Trails Only Yukon Association told them who to contact; after all, they asked for the poll.

Makes me wonder how many of the several thousand ATV owners (Ken Taylor’s quote in a previous article) were included.

To me, this whole report is a bunch of bull.

The real issue behind this debate started a while ago, when the mentioned people, Taylor and Tony Grabowski, plus others, found ATVs were encroaching on “their” hunting areas. Thus started the idea to just ban them - a simple solution.

Now TOYA wants to heavily regulate where, when and how ATVs can be used.

Their problem is that the plan will not only affect ATV hunters, but ATV pleasure riders, mining companies, exploration companies, First Nation people, trappers, photographers, etc.

You can’t single out just one user group; or do you plan to do this as well?

The article mentions TOYA is collecting photos of the damage done by ATVs, and they say restrictions would result in “fewer ugly scars marring Yukon’s fragile hinterland.”

Well, I am also collecting photos of scarring on the hinterland, which is much more severe and will take much longer to heal than any ATV trail. Thank goodness we have had mining exploration for the past many years.

Many good ATV trails and roads have come from this. But also much scarring (TOYA’s term).

I have been to the 6,700-foot elevation on some of these trails. One is able to enjoy many parts of the Yukon from these trails that would have otherwise been only accessible from a plane or helicopter.

If they want to see scarring, check out the “approved mining and exploration” going on all around us.

As for people writing in to say how, “ATVs are seen roaring through the tundra trying to scare up moose so his partner can shoot one.” Or one letter last fall saying, “I see Argos and quads running mountain sheep to a lather at over 4,000-foot elevation.”

Well, those people have no idea how improbable that would be.

This is impossible. Just spreading BS, I’d say.

On a last note, I’d like to get people to look up a letter to the editor in the September 24, 2010, Yukon News by Mike Kohler, from Fox Lake, “Dispelling myths about ATVs, trails and game.”

I’d say he hit the nail on the head, and has said it much better than many.

Thanks Kohler, I agree.

Bill Lammers

Whitehorse