Dylan Reed, representing Yukon, got enough big air to place second during the Canada Cup Series at Mount Sima on Nov. 26. Over 50 competitors came from across Canada to battle for the top title. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)

Yukon freestyle skiers start off strong in Canada Cup Series

Men’s skiers take two second places and a third at Mount Sima event

The Canada Cup Series kicked off last weekend at Mount Sima and Yukon skiers more than held their own in both slopestyle and the newly-added big air events on Nov. 25 – 26.

In the men’s big air finals on Sunday, two Yukoners were on the podium. Dylan Reed took second place and Etienne Geoffroy-Gagnon placed third.

Alberta’s Colin Bridger took first place with a score of 92.40.

Rounding out the local talent, Niko Rodden finished in 10th and Miguel Rodden narrowly missed a spot in the finals with a 21st-place effort.

Earlier in the weekend, Geoffroy-Gagnon earned a second-place finish in the men’s slopestyle on Saturday. Miguel Rodden finished 22nd in the finals, and Reed and Niko Rodden both fell short of advancing to the finals.

Luke Smart, competing out of B.C., finished first in slopestyle.

The ladies’ events did not include any Yukon talent, but Albertan Megan Cressey took top spot in both big air and slopestyle.

This marked the second year in a row the Yukon Freestyle Ski Association (YFSA) hosted a Canada Cup event but the first time big air was contested.

Lynda Harlow, president of the YFSA, said the weekend was a huge success and that this year’s event showed growth from last year.

“I haven’t got the total [numbers] — there were a couple scratches — but we actually had more [skiers] than we did last year,” said Harlow. “[It was] a really good turnout.”

Athletes travelled from across the country for the event, with skiers from Alberta, Quebec, B.C., Ontario, Yukon and Nova Scotia competing.

While the weekend had lots on the go, Harlow said organizers and volunteers did a fantastic job.

“It was very busy, but we think it was great,” said Harlow. “We handled it no problem.”

Freestyle Canada created the Canada Cup Series to serve as a national circuit for Canadian athletes to compete in all disciplines of freestyle skiing. This year’s series includes a dozen different stops and wraps up March 25 with events in Stoneham, Que. and Jasper, Alta.

The YFSA is planning a rail jam for local athletes in December and will host the Yukon Championships near the end of the ski season.

Contact John Hopkins-Hill at john.hopkinshill@yukon-news.com

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