Vincent Menard draws back on his bow during the indoor archery championships at Takhini Elementary School in Whitehorse on May 5. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)

Indoor Archery Championship includes best from across the Yukon

The 7th Indoor Archery Yukon Championship was May 5 at Tahkini Elementary School in Whitehorse.

Hosted by the Yukon Aboriginal Sport Circle, the championship included 15 archers competing in compound, recurve and barebow categories.

Sarah Walz, sport coordinator for archery, said the day was a success.

“It went really good,” said Walz. “There were kids, there were adults, and some different communities represented too. We had (archers) from Dawson, Watson Lake and Marsh Lake. It was a good turnout.”

Walz said the number of archers and the geographic representation were highlights.

“It wasn’t just shooters from Whitehorse and the shooting line was full,” she said. “It didn’t look like an empty gym.”

In the compound categories, five archers competed in three age groups.

Vincent Menard finished first in junior with a score of 574 and Seth Chief was second with a 493.

In cadet, Sofija Jewell was first with a 549 and Sam Bugg was second with a 420.

Emmett Kapaniuk finished first in cub with a 536.

The largest group of archers was the recurve categories with six participants.

Alan Hansen was the top master with a 511. Emma TomTom competed in cadet and scored a 475.

Mitchell Rudolph won cub with a 402, edging out Gabriela Browning who scored a 370 and William van den Hoorn.

Finally in the barebow categories, four archers competed.

Kirk Poraykoa was first in master with a 306 and Noah Dumaine was first in peewee with a 339.

In cub, Janeva Pope finished ahead of van den Hoorn.

This year, the tournament results are being submitted to Archery Canada for the first time.

“That’s something we’re trying to do with a lot of our tournaments – have them more official so they’re registered,” explained Walz. “It kind of just helps put (the archers) on the map with other kids competing across Canada.”

After the main competition, archers took time for a money shoot with $40 to the winner, $20 to second and $10 to third. The archers split into compound and recurve/barebow categories, creating more chances to win prizes.

“There were some really young kids and some of our more competitive kids that just came to the Canada Winter Games,” said Walz. “They were competing for the same prize money.”

With the return of warmer weather, most of the youth archery programs have now shifted to outdoor shooting.

The schools 3D competition is the next event on the calendar, scheduled for May 22 and 23 and open to students across the Yukon in Grade 6 and above.

Although dates aren’t yet finalized, there are also plans to schedule a number of 3D tournaments over the summer.

Contact John Hopkins-Hill at john.hopkinshill@yukon-news.com

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