Yukon Sixties Scoop lawsuit no longer class action

Two Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in citizens submitted an amended statement of claim to the Yukon Supreme Court

A Yukon lawsuit over the Sixties Scoop is no longer being pursued as a class-action.

Instead, Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in citizens Charles Eshleman and Christine Mullin submitted an amended statement of claim to the Yukon Supreme Court earlier this month outlining alleged details specific to each of their lives and individual experiences of being removed from their homes as children.

The pair had originally filed their lawsuit against the Attorney General of Canada and the Yukon Commissioner in October 2017. It was framed as a class-action on behalf of “all other First Nation, Inuit or Métis persons who were removed from their families or communities in the Yukon Territory by or on behalf of the Government of Canada or the Commissioner of Yukon during the period 1950 to 1993 and as a result lost their language and cultural identity and suffered the Rights Abuses and Individual Abuses described herein.”

However, in a July 30 interview, lawyer Dan Shier said Eshleman and Mullin have since decided to pursue the legal action as co-plaintiffs instead of as a class action in order to allow for a faster resolution.

“A class action would take a very long time to arrive at a conclusion, and in order to expedite the case, proceeding on a test-case basis makes the most sense,” he said.

The case has not yet gone to trial.

Contact Jackie Hong at jackie.hong@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Whitehorse’s Dahria Beatty and Emily Nishikawa are ready for the World Cup season

“It is still very exciting and the same kind of feelings you get every year”

Yukon government declares climate emergency

The call was made after a successful amendment by the NDP

Municipal leaders zero in on communication when it comes to the next MP

Yukon communities want more communication with feds

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

New policy would govern how city facilities are booked

The new policy sets out priorities for the use of city recreation spaces

New city policy would keep most roundtable talks with Whitehorse council open

New policy comes after council backed away from a policy that would have closed the meetings

Elite Martial Arts Academy grapplers prepare for return to Alaska State No-Gi Submission Grappling Championships

“We’ve been ramping up practices and getting it more intense because it’s just a whole new level”

Whitehorse city news, briefly

Some of the decisions discussed at the council meeting Oct. 7

YG to spend $2.2M on diesel generators in light of cancelled thermal plant

Now that plans for a new thermal plant have been nixed, the… Continue reading

Bike biathlon timing a bullseye

The event wrapped up just hours before Whitehorse received more than 15 centimetres of snow

COMMENTARY: After a good start, there’s more work to do on Yukon’s wetland policy

We are now lagging behind the initially proposed schedule by about four months

Yukon Schools Mountain Bike Races wrap with Mount McIntyre finale

The third and final Yukon Schools Mountain Bike Race of the fall… Continue reading

Commentary: Change is on our doorstep

Donald Reid Wild species and places offer so much to Yukoners. They… Continue reading

Most Read