Yukon man’s bail request rejected

Kevin Roy Grunerud’s request for bail was denied on Monday in light of a long history of previous bail violations that have resulted in violent…

Kevin Roy Grunerud’s request for bail was denied on Monday in light of a long history of previous bail violations that have resulted in violent acts against his common-law spouse.

“Mr. Grunerud has demonstrated a blatant and dangerous disregard of court orders and the safety of others,” wrote Justice Ron Veale in the official decision document.

“It would be folly to give him another chance in the light of his past behaviour, and the community would justifiably lose confidence in the administration of justice.”

In December 2006, Grunerud slammed his spouse’s head into a microwave, threw her into a stove and ripped the phone out of the wall when she attempted to call police.

He pleaded guilty in February to the crimes, and was put into the Domestic Violence Treatment Option program with strict instructions not to contact his spouse.

The next day, he broke these arrangements by showing up at his spouse’s home.

A month later, on March 4, Grunerud showed up intoxicated at his spouse’s home. When she didn’t open the door, he smashed it down with a sledgehammer and immediately threatened to kill her.

Grunerud’s spouse took refuge with her son in the bathroom, and police arrived just as her husband was smashing the door down with the sledgehammer.

Grunerud was arrested and charged, but later released on bail conditions into the custody of his mother.

In November, he once again breached bail conditions by finding his spouse at a new location, hitting and choking her, and then ramming her car in the parking lot while she escaped with her son.

Grunerud would remain at large until he was arrested in Tumbler Ridge, BC, on January 15th, for striking his employer with a flashlight after being asked to change a tire.

The community has responded with “significant” support, said the decision document — a factor that would normally ensure Grunerud’s release on bail conditions.

A former employer volunteered to post a $10,000 cash bond and act as a surety while Grunerud was on their gold mining property. A Whitehorse contractor also stepped forward to act as a surety to Grunerud.

However, past infractions outweighed whatever Grunerud’s outpourings of community support, decided the court.

“The most significant circumstance is that Mr. Grunerud’s alleged acts have all occurred in the face of court orders attempting to protect the mother and child who are the victims of these actions,” said Veale.