Yukon Energy in Whitehorse on April 8. Yukon Energy faced a potential “critical” fuel shortage in January due to an avalanche blocking a shipping route from Skagway to the Yukon, according to an email obtained by the Yukon Party and questioned in the legislature on Oct. 14. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)

Yukon Energy in Whitehorse on April 8. Yukon Energy faced a potential “critical” fuel shortage in January due to an avalanche blocking a shipping route from Skagway to the Yukon, according to an email obtained by the Yukon Party and questioned in the legislature on Oct. 14. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)

Yukon Energy faced ‘critical’ fuel shortage last January due to avalanche

An email obtained by the Yukon Party showed energy officials were concerned

Yukon Energy faced a potential “critical” fuel shortage in January due to an avalanche blocking a shipping route from Skagway to the Yukon, according to an email obtained by the Yukon Party and questioned in the legislature on Oct. 14.

“We had a situation last year where we were in a position where fuel was very scarce and we were at a very critical point. I think that my office and the Yukon Energy Corporation have an obligation to take that into consideration and make sure that we take lessons learned from that and that we do have a contingency plan,” said Energy, Mines and Resources Minister Ranj Pillai.

In January 2020, after an avalanche closed the Skagway pass, the interruption to the supply chain for fuel created an “edgy” situation, according to an email between Yukon Energy staff obtained by the opposition.

The information was obtained by an access to information request by the Yukon Party that produced a copy of an email from Jan. 16 between Yukon Energy officials.

“Our supplier gets their fuel from Skagway. They have supply for a few days,” wrote a Yukon Energy employee, whose name is redacted in the copy of the email. The employee says they have purchased fuel and are bringing it up from the south.

“My contact says they aren’t panicking yet but are a bit edgy with the situation,” the employee continues.

The email is addressed to Yukon Energy president Andrew Hall, vice president Michael Brandt, vice president Ed Mollard and vice president Gary Gazankas.

Any member of the public, including politicians and journalists, can access government records under the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy legislation. According to the Yukon Party, the initial request made in June yielded “no records found” and a complaint had to be filed before obtaining the email.

On the floor of the House, Yukon Party MLA Stacey Hassard noted that the temperatures the week of the email went down to -40 C.

“The prospect of running out of fuel during such frigid temperatures is certainly scary, especially for Yukoners who rely on electricity to heat their homes,” Hassard said.

“What is the government’s plan to ensure that Yukoners do not have to be a bit edgy around our fuel supplies this winter?” he said.

In response to questioning, Pillai told the legislature that he would discuss “lessons learned” with Yukon Energy from the situation and report back to the House.

“It really came down to, in one particular case, (the) Skagway pass being closed. We were in a position where normally we would see shipments of fuel come over that pass,” Pillai said.

“We did work very closely with the Minister of Highways and Public Works to monitor that situation and to move as quickly as we could to move fuel over, but the team at Yukon Energy Corporation were very innovative. They reached out across the territory and to ATCO as well to ensure that we had fuel,” he said.

Pillai said the situation with the pass closure was “a perfect storm.”

The opposition linked the fuel shortage to an earlier discussion on the decision to cancel a thermal power plant and rely on rented diesel generators for back-up power, but Pillai said regardless of the technology used, the issue, in either case, is obtaining fuel.

“I’m going to make that commitment to the members opposite to come back and work with Yukon Energy to ensure that they do have a contingency plan so that we’re ready in case something like this happens in January 2021,” he said.

Pillai said he doesn’t anticipate COVID-19 border closures affecting supply.

Contact Haley Ritchie at haley.ritchie@yukon-news.com

Yukon Energy

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Yukon First Nation Education Directorate education advocates and volunteers help to sort and distribute Christmas hamper grocery boxes outside Elijah Smith Elementary School on Feb. 23. (Rebecca Bradford Andrew/Submitted)
First Nation Education Directorate begins Christmas hamper program

Pick-ups for hampers are scheduled at local schools

Cyrine Candido, cashier, right, wipes down the new plexi-glass dividers at Superstore on March 28, before it was commonplace for them to wear masks. The Yukon government is relaunching the Yukon Essential Workers Income Support Program as the second wave of COVID-19 begins to take place in the territory. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Yukon Essential Workers Income Support Program extended to 32 weeks

More than 100 businesses in the territory applied for the first phase of the program

City of Whitehorse staff will report back to city council members in three months, detailing where efforts are with the city’s wildfire risk reduction strategy and action plan for 2021 to 2024. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Council adopts wildfire risk reduction plan

Staff will report on progress in three months

asdf
WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World for Nov. 25, 2020

Ivan, centre, and Tennette Dechkoff, right, stop to chat with a friend on Main Street in Whitehorse on Nov. 24. Starting Dec. 1 masks will be mandatory in public spaces across the Yukon in order to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)
UPDATED: Masks mandatory in public places starting on Dec. 1

“The safe six has just got a plus one,” Silver said.

Lev Dolgachov/123rf
The Yukon’s Information and Privacy Commissioner stressed the need to safeguard personal information while shopping this holiday season in a press release on Nov. 24.
Information and Privacy Commissioner issues reminder about shopping

The Yukon’s Information and Privacy Commissioner Diane McLeod-McKay stressed the need to… Continue reading

Keith Lay speaks at a city council meeting on Dec. 4, 2017. Lay provided the lone submission to council on the city’s proposed $33 million capital spending plan for 2021 on Nov. 23, taking issue with a number of projects outlined. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Resident raises issues with city’s capital budget

Council to vote on budget in December

Beatrice Lorne was always remembered by gold rush veterans as the ‘Klondike Nightingale’. (Yukon Archives/Maggies Museum Collection)
History Hunter: Beatrice Lorne — The ‘Klondike Nightingale’

In June of 1929, 11 years after the end of the First… Continue reading

Samson Hartland is the executive director of the Yukon Chamber of Mines. The Yukon Chamber of Mines elected a new board of directors during its annual general meeting held virtually on Nov. 17. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
Yukon Chamber of Mines elects new board

The Yukon Chamber of Mines elected a new board of directors during… Continue reading

The Yukon Hospital Corporation has released its annual report for 2019-20, and — unsurprisingly — hospital visitations were down. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Annual report says COVID-19 had a large impact visitation numbers at Whitehorse General

The Yukon Hospital Corporation has released its annual report for 2019-20, and… Continue reading

Whitehorse City Hall. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
City hall, briefly

A look at decisions made by Whitehorse city council this week

City council was closed to public on March 23 due to gathering rules brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. The council is now hoping there will be ways to improve access for residents to directly address council, even if it’s a virtual connection. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Solution sought to allow for more public presentations with council

Teleconference or video may provide opportunities, Roddick says

Most Read