Crystal Schick/Yukon News Yukon Premier and finance minister Sandy Silver tabled the Yukon government’s carbon rebate bill March 11.

Yukon carbon rebate bill tabled in the legislative assembly

Yukon premier and finance minister Sandy Silver tabled the bill March 11.

Yukon premier and minister of finance Sandy Silver tabled a carbon tax rebate bill in the legislative assembly March 11, another step towards returning the money that Yukoners will pay into the tax.

The move follows a public engagement period that wrapped up on Feb. 4. Thirty emails were received by the Department of Finance from residents, according to a Yukon government webpage, noting that there was some concern about how the carbon tax could impact businesses.

As a result of the engagement period, though, the Yukon government will craft more regulations intended to reduce emissions from large mines, according to a press release.

“This will be done by directing revenues from the federal Output-Based Pricing System towards investments in green energy made by large mines,” it says. “These regulations will be developed in the coming years.”

Ahead of the federal backstop, which comes into effect this summer, the Yukon government released its proposed plan for the rebate program on Jan. 17.

That plan lays out how residents, businesses and municipalities, among others, will be compensated for paying into the tax.

Starting on July 1, each tonne of carbon will be taxed by $20. This number will climb incrementally by $10 until it hits $50 by 2022. The levy will plateau afterwards.

Yukoners are to receive rebates in October.

Contact Julien Gignac at julien.gignac@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Yukon’s Dylan Cozens selected by the Buffalo Sabres seventh overall in the NHL draft

Cozens is the first Yukoner to be selected in the first round of the draft

Man fined after unsuccessfully arguing Yukon driving laws don’t apply to him

Christopher Brown was found guilty of four charges under the Motor Vehicles Act on June 20

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

Fossilized teeth found near Old Crow belonged to ancient hyena

The two fossilized teeth were discovered in 1973 and 1977

Changes could mean closing Whitehorse council and senior management meetings to the public

Sessions, which are separate from official council meetings, would be closed to the public

Letter: Celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day

Celebrated on June 21, National Indigenous Peoples Day is around the corner.… Continue reading

City news, briefly

A summary of some of the issues discussed at the June 17 Whitehorse city council meeting

Whitehorse training conference highlighted trans health care needs

The conference, hosted by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health, was June 13-15

COMMENTARY: Foreign funding for local environmental groups no conspiracy

Foreign funding doesn’t mean activism isn’t locally grown, says CPAWS Yukon’s executive director

Letter: Yukoners want ‘climate action now’

Yukoners Concerned are excited that despite the basketball game on TV, over… Continue reading

Letter: Cars and bikes — let’s take care of each other

As a dedicated long-time cyclist who has plied the Alaska Highway route… Continue reading

Letter: Flag gone missing on the Chilkoot Trail

Note: a copy of this letter has been sent to Christopher Hunter,… Continue reading

Yukon Orienteering Championships continue with sprint races

Held over three weeks, the championships include middle-distance, sprint and long-distance races

Most Read