Seven-year-old twins Quenton, left, and Carolyne Doon walk with there dad Andrew Doon at the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada’s first annual Brain Tumour Walk in Whitehorse on June 15. Approximately 100 people attended the walk which raised almost $24,000. (Stephanie Waddell/Yukon News)

Whitehorse’s first official Brain Tumour Walk raises $24,000

The Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada held its first annual Brain Tumour Walk in Whitehorse June 15, where participants managed to raise almost $24,000 for brain tumour research and awareness.

The Brain Tumour Foundation raises funds for brain tumour research and awareness, as well as support for brain tumour patients and survivors. Every summer, they hold fundraising walks in many cities throughout the country.

Event organizers estimate that “over 100” participants came out to the walk, which took place on Whitehorse’s Millennium Trail. Compared to larger cities that also held walks, Whitehorse managed to raise a lot of funds, said event volunteer and coordinator Alexandra Armstrong.

“We raised one sixth of what Calgary raised, but we’re far less than one sixth of their population,” she said. “We made a huge dent.”

Although this was the first walk in Whitehorse officially organized by the foundation, an unofficial walk was held last year by Dayna Magnuson, a Whitehorse resident who was diagnosed with brain cancer in January 2018.

After undergoing surgery in the same month as her diagnosis, she learned about the foundation and realized that the Yukon was one of the only regions in Canada without a walk.

“I got in contact with them and they encouraged me to do a do-it-yourself walk,” she said.

She organized one for that year, which turned out more successful than she anticipated.

“I was hoping to raise like $1,000, but we actually raised like $15,000.”

After the success for that event, the Brain Tumour Foundation invited Magnuson to attend a conference in Toronto, where officials announced that they would be holding their first walk in Whitehorse.

Armstrong and Magnuson credit the foundation with bringing along more sponsors, advertising, volunteers and a larger turnout. However, Armstrong added that Magnuson’s work in raising awareness was critical in bringing people to the event.

“A lot of it was effort through Dayna, despite going through radiation and chemo. She still went out there and really advertised it and got a lot of talk around for it.”

Magnuson hopes that next year’s walk will be even bigger, noting that brain tumours gets less donations than other forms of cancer.

“It’s so underfunded, and yet 27 Canadians are diagnosed with brain tumours everyday,” she said. “If there’s no funds, there’s no research.”

Julie TerVrught, walk and engagement and events associate for the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada, came to Whitehorse to attend the event. She said it was “wonderful” to bring the walk to Whitehorse.

“Whitehorse is an incredibly generous community, and it was great to see the support in terms of donations that were made, their enthusiasm, their support (and) their willingness to help out with anything,” she said.

She was also enthused about the amount of funds they were able to raise, despite Whitehorse’s smaller population.

“It just shows how much support Whitehorse shows towards other good causes. They threw their support behind Dayna and other walk survivors wholeheartedly.”

Contact Joshua Azizi at joshua.azizi@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Woman’s death in Ross River confirmed to be a homicide, Yukon RCMP says

Maryann Ollie, 59, died on Aug. 1. She was a citizen of Ross River Dena Council.

Jack Amos adds to Yukon medal count at Western Canada Summer Games

The territory’s athletes now have six medals — one silver and five bronze

Start of the Whitehorse school year signals traffic changes

School zones in effect starting Aug. 21

Canada Games Centre tests new software

You may want to hold off on buying those punch cards

YCCMA Mosquito Harescramble includes record numbers for return of ladies class

“I think it’s a good indication it’s turning to a family sport versus what it has been in the past”

Yukonomist: Fun facts for your next violent barbecue debate about government jobs

Have you ever been at a barbecue where someone starts talking loudly… Continue reading

Yukon disc golfers compete in Trilogy Challenge

“We definitely are seeing a lot of new people starting into the sport”

History Hunter: New book celebrates Yukon’s most colourful hotel

If the walls could talk, what tales they would tell. But the… Continue reading

River Trail Marathon tests runners with heat and sun

“It was very hot in the second half, but the volunteers are amazing and there is water often”

Chili and Beans Race the perfect recipe for a rainy day

“It’s good. Especially in these conditions because you know you have a warm bowl of chili waiting”

Most Read