Whitehorse City Hall. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)

Whitehorse city hall news, briefly

A summary of decisions made by Whitehorse city council at its June 10 meeting

Litter fences coming to landfill

New litter fences will be at the Whitehorse landfill after council approved awarding a $126,120 contract for fencing to North Fraser Plumbing. Members also approved a budget amendment to allow the spending.

Windblown litter is becoming an increasing concern at the landfill, particularly when it comes to the impact it can have on plant life downwind and on the landfill’s electric fence as it can contribute to diminishing voltage.

The modular litter fences the city will purchase are built to trap litter so it doesn’t become windblown again; it was highlighted in an earlier report to council. The fencing is designed to be easily moved depending on what the wind’s direction.

The city had originally budgeted $95,000 for the fencing, but given the changes in market conditions in North America the prices went up and thus the bids were more than anticipated.

Additional funding will come from city reserves, though officials anticipate applying for gas tax funding for the project. If that comes through, it would reimburse the reserves used.

Groundwater protection plan contract awarded

City council voted to award Bolometric Environmental a contract worth $83,550 to come up with a groundwater protection plan.

The plan will be an update to the 2013 source water protection plan. Under that initiative, the city decommissioned old wells, installed monitoring wells in Riverdale, did site work at active well sites and conducted a public education campaign.

The need for the latest project came about due to regulation updates.

The work will include a 3-D model of the Selkirk aquifer, as part of an assessment to update the hydro-geological conditions of the area, the wells and associated potential risks of contamination.

Community service grants gets through first two readings

There are 18 organizations closer to receiving some help on their property tax bill after city council approved the first two readings of the bylaw for municipal charges and community service grants for 2019.

The grants would total $105,908.

As Lindsay Schneider, the city’s manager of financial services explained in a previous report to council, the grants are in place “to assist organizations in the payment of municipal property taxes and other specific municipal charges.”

Under the program, community organizations can receive anywhere between 50 and 100 per cent of property taxes owed up to the $50,000 cap the city has put in place that any one organization can receive from the city in a single year.

Third reading of the bylaw governing the grants will come forward at council’s June 24 meeting.

All 2019 property taxes in the city are due July 2.

Public hearing set on Whistle Bend Phase 7 zoning

Have some thoughts to share on the seventh phase of the Whistle Bend neighbourhood?

A public hearing on the proposed zoning is set for July 8 after council approved first reading of the zoning bylaw for Phase 7. Following the hearing, a report will come to council with the final readings expected Aug. 5.

Anyone can address council on the proposed zoning plans at that public hearing, which will be part of the council meeting beginning at 5:30 p.m. July 8.

Under the proposal for the area on the outer perimeter of the neighbourhood, there would be 90 residential properties zoned for larger single detached or duplex homes. It’s expected many of those houses will be able to accommodate legal rental suites. That section of the neighbourhood would also see a large greenbelt over the sewage force main, as development can’t happen there. The perimeter trail that’s become a defining feature of the neighbourhood would also continue around Phase 7 to allow for more active transportation throughout the neighbourhood.

Contact Stephanie Waddell at stephanie.waddell@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Yukoners turn out in droves for Skagway Marathon

More than half the 162-person field at the Alaska race calls the Yukon home

NGC withdraws lane closure application

Shorter period closures may be required

Support coordinator filling in ‘gaps’ in services for Yukon sexual assault victims

Reem Girgrah was hired as victim support coordinator for the Yukon’s SART in April

Cook Street property owners will face LIC

Road work is planned for 2020

Whitehorse fire chief fired

Mike Dine, who was hired in June 2018, was fired by the city on June 14.

Whitehorse fish ladder open for the season

Manager Brittany Key said there are low expectations for chinook salmon numbers

Strong results for Yukoners at B.C. triathlons

Athletes competed at the Subaru Ironman 70.3 Victoria and the Oliver Half Iron and Aquabike

Yukon woman found guilty of selling crack to undercover officer in 2017

Diana Johns’ lawyer says he’s planning on launching an entrapment application

Give Hope Wings fundraiser launches Saturday from Pitt Meadows

Flying marathon will benefit low income Canadians needing flights for medical treatment

Driving with Jens: Keeping pets safe in your vehicle

In my last column I discussed ways to avoid the tragedy which… Continue reading

Yukonomist: Whitehorse Troughbillies

Yukon could take its hot rocks to the bank

ParticipACTION Community Better Challenge spurs mountain bike races in Whitehorse

“I have to remind myself to do that sometimes – just slow down and look around.”

Whitehorse FC Premier U15 boys finish fourth despite injuries and short bench at Slurpee Cup

“They worked super hard and were more hungry for the win than the other team”

Most Read