Trial begins in mechanic’s death

Trial begins in mechanic's death A trial following the death of a Whitehorse mechanic in 2011 has begun in Yukon Territorial Court. Denis Chabot was working on a tractor-trailer at Integra Tire in November of that year.

A trial following the death of a Whitehorse mechanic in 2011 has begun in Yukon Territorial Court.

Denis Chabot was working on a tractor-trailer at Integra Tire in November of that year. The driver of the truck, a North 60 employee, moved the vehicle and crushed Chabot underneath. He was 34.

Integra Tire, North 60 and two employees are facing charges under the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

The trial is expected to last three weeks and feature more than two dozen witnesses, the court heard this week.

According to a preliminary report released by the Yukon Workers’ Compensation, Health and Safety Board in early 2012, Chabot had been taking the tires off and siping them – cutting thin slits to improve traction. When he finished, he told his supervisor the vehicle was ready for pickup and went to give it a final check.

North 60 Petro Ltd. was notified and an employee was sent to pick it up.

When the employee arrived around 3:30 p.m., he found the vehicle idling and began to drive away.

The first witness to take the stand Monday was occupational health and safety officer Wayne Smyth, who investigated Chabot’s death.

He took judge John Faulkner through a series of photos taken at the scene as well as surveillance video recorded around the tire shop.

There were no witnesses to what happened that day and the video did not show the area where Chabot died, he said.

Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, the maximum penalty is $150,000 or one year in jail.