the tricks of nature

This bridge of ice is probably the result of ice leftover from a melted glacier. I believe the photograph was taken not too far from Atlin, BC by L.C. Read, the town photographer.

This bridge of ice is probably the result of ice leftover from a melted glacier. I believe the photograph was taken not too far from Atlin, BC by L.C. Read, the town photographer. As I mentioned in a previous column, I think the people standing on the ice bridge were tourists. At any rate, this is certainly a wonderful and unique photograph.

The following letter is from Samson Hartland who is a history buff and a collector, like myself. Thank you, Samson.

In regards to Can You Identify in the September 1 issue of the Yukon News.

Hartland’s letter follows:

The photo in question is entitled “Ice King’s Triumphal Arch” photographed at Llewellyn Glacier, Atlin, British Columbia on August 28, 1919. The negative is number 137 in the L.C. Read collection.

The Llewellyn Glacier extends from the southwestern tip of Atlin Lake almost to the Pacific Coast of Juneau, Alaska. It is one of the largest ice fields on the continent and is generally accepted as the source of the Yukon River.

I thoroughly enjoy this photo as it sure brings the sheer size of this arch into perspective. In fact, Read took a series of photos showing individuals climbing, crawling and exploring the glacier and its exquisite shapes and sizes.

Thank you for sharing it with us, Jim.

Samson Hartland

Anyone with information about this subject, please write Jim Robb: The Colourful Five Per Cent Scrapbook—Can You Identify? c/o the Yukon News, 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Yukon,

Y1A 2E4, or e-mail through the News website, www.yukon-news.com.