the a.j. goddard leaving bennett for dawson city in september 1899

Is the steamboat in this photograph the same boat that was recently found sunk in Lake Laberge? The wreck of the A.J. Goddard and its discovery by Doug Davidge continues to be the subject of much study and publicity.

Is the steamboat in this photograph the same boat that was recently found sunk in Lake Laberge?

The wreck of the A.J. Goddard and its discovery by Doug Davidge continues to be the subject of much study and publicity.

Many artifacts recovered from the wreck are now in the Yukon Transportation Museum. Things like a hand-crank gramophone, the vessel’s steam whistle, shoes, lantern, steam gauge, ink bottle, etc., are, or will be on exhibit there and are extremely interesting.

It gives us a vision into our historic past.

The builder, A.J. Goddard, was from Seattle, Washington, and arrived in Skagway in 1898.

He built the pioneer steamer Goddard. He had the only sawmill at Lake Bennett in 1898.

Also, he was the first president of the Alaska-Yukon Pioneers, the AYP – Cabin No. 1, and left the North in 1901.

The information is derived from the Alaska-Yukon Gold Book and the Whitehorse Star, July 23, 2010, and the photograph is from the MacBride Museum. The photographer was H.C. Barley.

Postscript: Don’t forget to visit the Yukon Transportation Museum to see the interesting A.J. Goddard steamship artifacts.

Anyone with information about this subject, please write Jim Robb: The Colourful Five Per Cent Scrapbook—Can You Identify? c/o the Yukon News, 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Yukon,

Y1A 2E4, or e-mail through

the News website, www.yukon-news.com.

Editor’s note:

Wednesday, through an editing error in Jim Robb’s Colourful Five Per Cent column, we accidentally killed Ted Harrison. The renowned Yukon painter is, of course, alive and well, and we apologize to both Harrison and Robb for our mistake.