Singh suggests a more vibrant downtown

Patrick Singh is a well-known face in the downtown core. The businessman and musician, who runs a hotdog stand at the corner of Main Street and Third Avenue, is once again seeking a seat on city council.

Patrick Singh is a well-known face in the downtown core.

The businessman and musician, who runs a hotdog stand at the corner of Main Street and Third Avenue, is once again seeking a seat on city council.

Singh also ran in the 2011 byelection to fill the city council seat vacated by Doug Graham, which Kirk Cameron eventually won. In the following year he took part in the municipal election, finishing with 628 votes.

He said he’s running on many of the ideas he came forward with during his 2012 campaign.

That includes more growth in the downtown core and more facilities for youth.

“I’d like to see this city become more vibrant,” he said.

“Close off Main Street between Second Avenue and Third Avenue in the summer time. There are a lot of talented musicians and artists here and we should use them, and that space, to attract more tourists.”

He believes developers should be allowed to build higher buildings, too.

As it stands, building height restrictions for most of downtown allow for 25-metre buildings. The city increased the limit by five metres in 2012 to encourage more growth in the downtown core.

Singh also wants to see more options for youth recreation. Maybe that could include a roller rink or an arcade, he said.

“When I grew up, there was always an arcade or roller rink where kids could hang out and keep them out of trouble,” he said.

“I don’t think there’s a central location where they can hang out.”

From his hotdog stand, Singh sees a lot of the city’s homeless population walking around, he said.

He believes a position could be created to help put some jobs in their hands.

“You could hire these people for odd jobs, like painting or fixing things,” he said.

Singh said his business gives him a good understanding of the pulse of the city.

He’s been serving smokies and hotdogs to people for the past eight years.

“This is my office,” he said.

“It’s a great place to meet people and find out what’s going on.”

Singh said Whitehorse residents have a good opportunity to elect a “whole new batch” of councillors, and wipe the slate clean. “Fresh ideas never hurt.”

“Maybe it’s time to let go of the people who have served for so long, and let the city go in a new direction,” he added.

Born in London, England, Singh moved to Canada with his family in 1974, settling in Edmonton.

He’s lived in Whitehorse for almost 25 years.

The municipal election will be held on Oct. 15.

Contact Myles Dolphin at

myles@yukon-news.com

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