rambling33

The word legacy is bandied about regularly by many we call the powers that be: politicians, national TV, national print media, and celebrities. Their gold-medal performances at lauding one another are legend; their legends define...

Sign under a clock in a classroom:

Time will pass. Will you?

Legacies:

The word legacy is bandied about regularly by many we call the powers that be: politicians, national TV, national print media, and celebrities. Their gold-medal performances at lauding one another are legend; their legends define their legacy!

Lauding one another is worthy behaviour. I’m not knocking it, illustrating it as the oft-taken meaning for the word legacy!

Then Ms. Thomson came along!

Ms. Thomson was a good teacher, says the story. She didn’t like Teddy though. Teddy was one of her Grade 5 students. He was unpopular, quiet, slow and he wasn’t clean. She expected he’d fail and have to repeat the grade, so she paid him little attention.

As Christmas approached she was reviewing previous teachers’ notes on students, including Teddy. She found his mother had died and his father showed no interest in him. Guilt came to Ms. Thomson.

At Christmas, all the class brought her presents, including Teddy. The other students snickered at Teddy’s gift. It was a gaudy rhinestone bracelet, with stones missing, and a half-empty bottle of cheap cologne.

Ms. Thomson turned the situation on its head — she wore Teddy’s gifts.

He stayed after school and shyly told her, “You smell just like my Mom.”

After he left, she sat alone and cried. From then on she stayed late every afternoon helping Teddy catch up with his studies. He made it.

Teddy moved before entering Grade 6, but she felt he could now hold his own.

Seven years later she received a note from Teddy. He wanted her to be the first to know he’d graduated from high school and was second in his class.

Four years later, she received another letter from Teddy. Again he wanted her to be the first to know he’d graduated from university, first in his class.

Several years later another letter telling her he was now Dr. Teddy.

Ms. Thomson was proud to have played a small part in his success, but felt she owed him just as much for what he’d shown her. Because of his courage in seeking her love and attention she saw the potential in the little boy no one cared about.

Now that’s a legacy! And, it brings the real meaning of the word with it!

We live in hope the legacy of our recession proofing will equal Ms. Thomson’s.

Teachers open the door, but you

must enter by yourself.

Chinese Proverb

Engineers versus managers

A group of managers is given an assignment to measure the height of a flagpole. They take ladders and tape measures to the flagpole, though they’re awkward, falling off the ladders, dropping the tape measures — the whole thing is just a mess.

An engineer comes along, looks the situation over, pulls the flagpole out of the ground, lays it flat, measures it from end to end, gives the measurement to one of the managers and walks away.

After the engineer has gone, one manager turns to another and laughs.

“Isn’t that just like an engineer, we’re looking for the height and he gives us the length.”

We live in hope the hundreds of infrastructure managers about to be hired by governments will be at a higher level than those fellas, eh?

A tip of the hat to all who woke up this morning. It’s time to celebrate life, and Saint Valentine’s Day! Have a good one!  Oh, remember — money talks, chocolate sings!

[Ms. Thomson’s tale is from Bits & Pieces, a small magazine the publishers claim is the Magazine that Motivates the World.]