rambling17

Something to think about from the gals: A daily calendar from Mac's enlightens us everyday with wisdom from women. Some of the advice is old, some new, some fun, some controversial, some puzzling, and some blue.

Something to think about from the gals:

A daily calendar from Mac’s enlightens us everyday with wisdom from women. Some of the advice is old, some new, some fun, some controversial, some puzzling, and some blue. Many are like a GPS, pointing accurately at some of life’s truths.

Martina Navratilova started it all with “Labels are for filing. Labels are for clothing. Labels are not for people.” Talk about right on! On appearance, Shelley Winters brought a smile: “I’m not overweight, I’m just nine inches too short.” Cathy Ladman thinks, “High heels are ridiculous. It’s like putting a building on the head of a pin.”

Life is uncertain. Eat dessert first. Ernestine Ulmer

About men, well, Katherine Hepburn commented: “Sometimes I wonder if men and women really suit each other. Perhaps they should live next door and just visit now and then.” Hmm, Roseanne went along, “My husband said he needed more space, so I locked him outside,” while Marilyn Monroe, not unexpectedly, came up with, “I don’t mind living in a man’s world as long as I can be a woman in it!” Wrapping this one up philosophically we have Lenore Coffee: “When a man of 40 falls in love with a woman of 20 it isn’t her youth he’s seeking, it’s his own.”

The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. Dorothy Parker

And then there’s chocolate: “Forget love – I’d rather fall in chocolate,” Sandra J. Dykesll said. She was joined by another Sandra, Boynton by surname, who added, “Research tells us 14 out of 10 individuals like chocolate,” while Judith Viorst uses it to define strength: “Strength is the ability to break chocolate into four pieces with your bare hands – and then eat just one of those pieces.”

It isn’t where you came from; it’s where you’re going that counts. Ella Fitzgerald

Ah children! Barbara Kingsolver: “It kills you to see them grow up, but I guess it would kill you quicker if they didn’t.” Abigail Van Buren is close to the mark with her advice that “If you want children to keep their feet on the ground, put some responsibility on their shoulders.” Marcelen Cox’s philosophy is that “Children in a family are like flowers in a bouquet; there’s always one determined to face in an opposite direction from the way the arranger desires.” And I think Marilyn Penland is daring us by suggesting, “Sing out loud in the car, even, or especially if, it embarrasses your children.”

To acquire knowledge one must study, but to acquire wisdom one must observe. Marilyn vos Savant

A tip of the hat to women’s wisdom, around us daily, although, unfortunately, usually only celebrities are quoted. Mores the pity, to quote Grandma. Who among them hasn’t echoed Gertrude Stein saying: “Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.” Others have shared the resolution from Bonnie Friedman: “An unhurried sense of time is in itself a form of wealth.”

Without quotes from Jane Doe, we seek the admirable Dame Edith Stilwell: “I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it. Then there is her astute assessment of our gullibility: “The public will believe anything so long as it is not founded on truth.”

Oh, well, maybe Barbara Jordan has it with her tongue-in-cheek thought: “Think what a better world it would be if we all, the whole world, had cookies and milk about three o’clock every afternoon and then lay down on our blankets for a nap.” Sounds much like the siesta, a hot climate tradition we may appreciate before our heat wave is over. Enjoy!