Quarry threatens trapline’s integrity

A proposed riprap quarry on the Livingstone Trail is raising opposition from Kwanlin Dun members who say the quarry will conflict with an historical…

A proposed riprap quarry on the Livingstone Trail is raising opposition from Kwanlin Dun members who say the quarry will conflict with an historical trapline.

The quarry will disrupt trapline 288, long used by Kwanlin Dun elder Fred Smith, who died in 2005. His grandson Sean, daughter Ann Smith and son-in-law Brian Walker voiced their concerns to city council on Monday.

“(Riprap) is a needed purpose, I can understand that, but there are other quarries within the city of Whitehorse from which they can obtain the material,” said Sean — who lives on and maintains the trapline.

Following Smith’s death, the Yukon government, which currently owns the land, assured the family that the trapline designation would be maintained and held until the family recovered, said Walker.

“The impact on trapline concession 288 will be minimal, as the estimated area of the concession is over 300 square kilometres, while the proposed quarry is less than one square kilometre,” said a city document.

“It’s a small amount … but when you start influencing an area by development, people move in, animals move out,” said Sean.

“My family has inherited a responsibility to respect the trapline number 288, and the right to traditionally use it as it was given to our ancestors, our children, grandchildren and future generations,” said Ann.

Riprap is rock used to protect against erosion in construction projects. The proposed site will provide riprap to be used at the Livingstone Trail sewage lagoons.

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