Premier heads to Europe to boost Yukon tourism

Premier Darrell Pasloski is in Europe this week touting the Yukon as a tourist destination. He is joined by Tourism Minister Mike Nixon and 17 delegates representing 14 Yukon organizations.

Premier Darrell Pasloski is in Europe this week touting the Yukon as a tourist destination.

He is joined by Tourism Minister Mike Nixon and 17 delegates representing 14 Yukon organizations.

The group will visit Hannover and Frankfurt in Germany and London, England, over the nine-day trip.

“Truly it’s going to help us build our already-strong relationship with German-speaking Europe, as well as a newer relationship with the United Kingdom,” said Nixon in an interview Monday.

Germany and the U.K. are the first and third overseas markets for Yukon tourism, he said. Together they bring in $13 million annually.

Delegates represent tour operators like Holland America Line and CanaDream RV Rentals, hotels, and industry organizations like the Tourism Industry Association of the Yukon.

They were each responsible for paying for their way, but could apply to the Yukon government for partial funding, said Nixon.

One of the highlights of the trip will be visiting the Yukon Gold Rush Days at the Hannover Zoo, he said.

A few years ago, the zoo was planning an expansion, and looked to the Yukon to help them create the Yukon Bay, a new themed section of the park.

It includes, for example, replicas of historic Yukon buildings, polar bears, caribou, timber wolves, and, curiously, penguins.

Their presence is explained by a shipwreck replica at the Yukon Bay, and a story that goes along with it about how the penguins had stowed away on board, said Nixon.

He attended last year’s Yukon Gold Rush Days at the zoo, an event that attracted more than 27,000 visitors, he said.

The timing is right for a trade mission to Europe, said Nixon.

“Their economy over there still continues to steadily recover from the global economic downturn, so it’s a good time for us to really increase our profile.”

Many European tourists are drawn to the Yukon’s wide open spaces and wilderness adventure opportunities.

If asked during the trip about the fate of the Peel watershed, Nixon said he would tell the person doing the asking that he would get back to them.

“Getting them tied up into a political conversation isn’t something that I’m keen to do. I’m over there flying the Yukon flag loud and proud, and I want to tell people how great of a place this is, and encouraging as many of them to come over here and spend their money and visit the territory.”

Contact Jacqueline Ronson at

jronson@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Yukon suspect in B.C. mail bombing makes court appearance

Whitehorse man, Leon Nepper, faces charges related to a mail bomb sent to a Port Alice home Sept. 11

Yukon government considers changing the leave of absence laws

A public feedback period on the proposed changes is open until Oct. 6

Skull found on Whitehorse trail in 2009 ID’d as belonging to missing B.C. man

The skull, found on a trail near Long Lake Road, is that of Port Coquitlam man Terry Fai Vong.

COMMENTARY: Yukon municipal politics are not exempt from having gender-specific issues

‘The lack of action on holding taxi companies accountable is abominable’

Do-nut worry, Yukon’s donut business is still going strong

The next donut pop-up shop is on Sept. 6

The hazy future of the Yukon woodstove

The Yukon needs a clearer understanding of its air quality

Musings from a history hunter abroad

After touring England, France and Belgium, Michael Gates ‘bumping into history’ everywhere he turned

Most Read