Pasloski’s launch

As a federal campaign launch, it was a brief affair. After four minutes of introductory remarks, Conservative candidate Darrell Pasloski answered…

As a federal campaign launch, it was a brief affair.

After four minutes of introductory remarks, Conservative candidate Darrell Pasloski answered three questions and ended the media event.

Total time: six minutes.

The Conservatives won’t make “wild promises,” said the pharmacist and father of four who has lived in the Yukon 17 years.

The Liberal Party is running an “ideological campaign” and has “weak leadership,” while the Conservatives will build communities and deliver for Yukoners.

“The Yukon is a unique and important part of Canada,” said Pasloski.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is the best leader for Canada, he said.

The Liberal’s carbon tax plan is “ridiculous.”

After prepared remarks, Pasloski answered three media questions.

What is your greatest strength? asked a CBC reporter.

How will you unseat a long-time MP? asked a CHON FM reporter.

How much control does the campaign headquarters exert over your local messaging and how much freedom do you have to speak about issues? came another question.

“We’re going to take the opportunity to meet regularly with the media … on issues we see as important,” said Pasloski, ending the question-and-answer session.

“Thank you very much.”

“So you can speak freely? A few more questions?” asked a reporter.

“I have to run, we’re on a schedule,” said Pasloski.

“Were you given any directive on how much you can talk to the media?”

“Here we are talking to the media, and I look forward to doing this more,” he said.

“See you next time.”

Craig Tuton, a former Yukon Party campaign manager, stepped in and told reporters Pasloski would schedule individual interviews at a later date.

Tuton wouldn’t confirm his role in the Pasloski campaign.

“I work with the campaign,” he said.

In what capacity?

“I work with the campaign.”

Before the brief scrum, an Elijah Smith building employee expressed concern about hosting a political event.

A commissionaire later came outside and spoke with Tuton.

“I assumed this wasn’t federal property,” said Tuton, referring to the plaza at the front of the building.

“You’re not supposed to campaign on federal property,” he added.