National report includes missing and murdered Yukoners

It was seven years ago next week that Angel Carlick was last seen alive. The 19-year-old girl disappeared in May 2007, right before she was set to graduate high school.

It was seven years ago next week that Angel Carlick was last seen alive.

The 19-year-old girl disappeared in May 2007, right before she was set to graduate high school.

Her body was found months later in the Pilot Mountain subdivision. Police are still searching for someone or something that might be able to provide them with clues to what killed her.

The upcoming anniversary of Carlick’s tragic disappearance comes just after the RCMP have released a national report on missing and murdered aboriginal women across the country.

The number is staggering and has local advocates renewing their call for a national inquiry.

The report compiled data from 300 police forces across the country. It found 1,181 missing and murdered aboriginal women in Canadian police databases. That’s a combination of 164 missing women dating back to 1952 and 1,017 murdered women between 1980 and 2012.

Aboriginal women make up 16 per cent of female homicides and 11.3 per cent of missing women. This is three to four times higher than their representation in the overall Canadian population.

Only a handful of statistics in the report are broken down by jurisdiction.

Of the 18 women murdered in the Yukon between 1980 and 2012, 10 were aboriginal, or about 56 per cent.

That’s compared to 47 of 51 female murder victims in the Northwest Territories and all 20 of the female murder victims in Nunavut during the same period.

The number of unsolved murders in the Yukon involving an aboriginal woman: one.

The same data lists two unresolved missing aboriginal females in the Yukon.

The number of missing and murdered aboriginal women in the Yukon in this report is lower than numbers released by the local Sisters in Spirit campaign. But Marian Horne, president of the Yukon Aboriginal Women’s Council, says she’s confident the RCMP’s number will go up as investigations continue.

“Absolutely, I know it will, because this is just the tip of the iceberg,” she said.

The Yukon Sisters in Spirit campaign lists 38 missing or murdered women.

“What the public has to be aware of is that it’s not only an issue for First Nations, it’s also an issue for society in general,” Horne said.

Yukon RCMP Cpl. Calista MacLeod said there could be a number of reasons why the numbers are different. The national RCMP office that compiled the report is not providing more information beyond what is in the report.

Two of the women identified by Yukon Sisters in Spirit are Yukoners who went missing or were killed in other jurisdictions, MacLeod said.

In some cases the police only have a first name or a nickname. In one case, a missing woman has since been found.

A few are believed to have drowned and had their bodies swept away by some of the Yukon’s unforgiving waterways.

MacLeod said the goal of gathering the names was to honour the women’s stories.

She said the work by Sisters in Spirit has done a lot of good.

That includes helping the RCMP develop closer community relationships and debunk persistent myths, like the belief you need to wait 24 hours before reporting someone missing.

“If you’re worried then we have no rules, and never have, to wait,” she said.

Horne credits the Yukon RCMP with doing a good job of reaching out.

“(Chief Superintendent) Peter Clark has been a tremendous asset to us in Yukon, and (so has) all the RCMP,” she said. “We have teams that are apprising us regularly of the figures and asking as how we can correct the situation. But it’s a bigger issue than we can correct overnight.”

On a federal level, the numbers call for more action, she said.

“It is time for a national inquiry. We’ve been pushing for this for 10 years now. This is our 10th anniversary for Sisters in Spirit in October.”

Contact Ashley Joannou at

ashleyj@yukon-news.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

XX
WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World for May 5, 2021.… Continue reading

Crystal Schick/Yukon News Premier Sandy Silver, left, and Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley speak at a COVID-19 update press conference in Whitehorse on Nov. 19. They formally announced that as of Nov. 20, anyone entering the territory (including Yukoners returning home) would be required to self-isolate with the exception of critical service workers, those exercising treaty rights and those living in B.C. border towns
Vaccinated people won’t have to self-isolate in the Yukon after May 25

Restaurants and bars will also be able to return to full capacity at the end of the month.

An RV pulls into Wolf Creek Campground to enjoy the first weekend of camping season on April 30, 2021. John Tonin/Yukon News
Opening weekend of Yukon campgrounds a ‘definite success’

The territorial campgrounds opened on April 30. Wolf Creek was the busiest park seeing 95 per cent of sites filled.

Visitors from Ushiku, Japan visit the Carcross Desert as part of the exchange program Ushiku and Whitehorse have. The previously annual exchange has been cancelled for 2021 due to COVID-19. (Submitted)
Whitehorse-Ushiku sister city exchange cancelled

Officials said the exchange is cancelled due to COVID-19

The site of the Old Crow solar project photographed on Feb. 20. The Vuntut Gwitchin solar project was planned for completion last summer, but delays related to the COVID-19 pandemic pushed it back. (Haley Ritchie/Yukon News)
Old Crow is switching to solar

The first phase of the community’s solar array is already generating power.

Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
One new case of COVID-19 in the Yukon

Case number 82 is the territory’s only active case

Flood and fire risk and potential were discussed April 29. Yukoners were told to be prepared in the event of either a flood or a fire. Submitted Photo/B.C. Wildfire Service
Yukoners told to be prepared for floods and wildland fire season

Floods and fire personelle spoke to the current risks of both weather events in the coming months.

From left to right, Pascale Marceau and Eva Capozzola departed for Kluane National Park on April 12. The duo is the first all-woman expedition to summit Mt. Lucania. (Michael Schmidt/Icefield Discovery)
First all-woman team summits Mt. Lucania

“You have gifted us with a magical journey that we will forever treasure.”

Whitehorse City Hall (Yukon News file)
City news, briefly

Whitehorse goings-on for the week of April 26

The Yukon Department of Education in Whitehorse on Dec. 22, 2020. The department has announced new dates for the 2021/2022 school year. (John Hopkins-Hill/Yukon News file)
Yukon school dates set for 2021/22

The schedule shows classes starting on Aug. 23, 2021 for all Whitehorse schools and in some communities.

Letters to the editor.
Today’s mailbox: rent caps and vaccines

To Sandy Silver and Kate White Once again Kate White and her… Continue reading

Most Read