Money, job, but still homeless

When Chris Webb and his girlfriend moved to Whitehorse 16 months ago, they didn't have much trouble finding a place to live. Everyone told them it would be tough, but it wasn't too bad.

When Chris Webb and his girlfriend moved to Whitehorse 16 months ago, they didn’t have much trouble finding a place to live.

Everyone told them it would be tough, but it wasn’t too bad.

They looked at a few places that didn’t make the grade, and then put an ad in the paper.

Soon, they were offered a reasonably priced house in Riverdale that allowed pets and had a backyard big enough to plant a garden.

They considered themselves lucky.

But now it seems their luck has run out.

A few weeks ago, their landlord sold the house they’d been renting. And finding another place has been nearly impossible.

“We were renting for a year and we thought we were paying a lot coming from Victoria, but having been looking for the last month and a half, maybe not,” said Webb, who was paying more than $1,600 a month for their Whitehorse place, without fuel or utilities.

None of the places that they’ve looked at in the last few weeks are even close to as good as what they have now.

Most have been smaller or in a sorry state of disrepair.

And with few exceptions, all have been more expensive.

“Some of the ones we’ve looked at have been dumps and still they want a lot more money than what we’re paying now,” said Webb.

On top of it all, the competition for those places – even the dumps – has been fierce.

One landlord wouldn’t even tell them where his apartment was until they sat down to a half-hour interview, said Webb.

“It’s just eating my girlfriend up because she’s the worrier,” he said. “I can just see the stress level rising.”

That stress is beginning to turn into anger.

“At one point my girlfriend … we were so pissed off that we were going to go down to tent city and join the protest,” said Webb. “Who knows, we might end up there in a month.”

Their landlord was good enough to give them an extra four weeks. She made it a condition of the sale, which gave Webb and his girlfriend a little bit of breathing room.

However, with the clock running down, so are their options.

“We’re going to need a miracle,” he said. “Something’s going to have to drop out of the sky.”

Despite it all, Webb and his partner are still counting their blessings.

“It’s much worse for some people,” he said.

They still have a lot going for them.

“We have ton=s of money to rent and great references,” he said.

There is one thing that seems to keep holding them back, their cat.

“First off, 99 per cent of places say no pets,” said Webb.

One landlord actually told them that they should just get rid of their cat.

That’s not something that they’re willing to entertain – at least not yet.

See more housing stories on pages 5, 8, 10 and 59 to 74. And join the conversation on www.yukon-news.com and the Yukon News Facebook page.

Contact Josh Kerr at

joshk@yukon-news.com