One of 183 naloxone kits that were handed out to individuals in January 2017 to help combat fentanyl deaths in the territory. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)

Minister Pauline Frost says Yukon’s opioid action plan to be released

Frost also said the Yukon now has a bilateral funding agreement worth $500,000 to combat the crisis

Health and Social Services Minister Pauline Frost told reporters on Oct. 30 that an opioid action plan is slated to be released “in the next couple of days.”

During a press scrum after question period, the News asked when the plan will come down, exactly, to which Frost replied she didn’t have the specific information.

“As soon as we have it, I’d be happy to release it and share it with you. We’re working on that right now with the chief medical officer,” she said.

As well, it was during question period that it became apparent that the Yukon and federal governments are working together to mitigate the opioid crisis by way of $500,000 in funding.

“… (We) have now established an emergency treatment fund as a means to address opioid crises impacting all of Canada. We now have a bilateral agreement with Canada for $500,000. We didn’t have the resources historically,” Frost said in the House.

“We’ve not seen any supports from the federal government. That was (a) huge problem for us,” she told reporters later. “We’ve seen supports to B.C., we’ve seen supports to Alberta.”

She noted that Ottawa has committed to working with the Yukon to access funding for treatment and preventative programs.

“The scope of that is still being worked out and it will tie itself into the strategic plan,” she said.

Frost said that the commitment from the federal government was “verbal.”

The News reported last week that, according to Chief Medical Officer Brendan Hanley, there have been 16 opioid-related deaths in the territory. Fentanyl is associated with 12 of those deaths; of those 12, two died in 2018.

Chief Coroner Heather Jones has told the News that, on a per capita basis, the Yukon ranks third across the country as having the most opioid-related deaths — first is British Columbia, followed by Alberta.

Contact Julien Gignac at julien.gignac@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Vuntut Gwitchin citizen sues First Nation over council’s residency requirement

Cindy Dickson, a VGFN citizen who lives in Whitehorse, had her nomination forms rejected for the 2018 election

Video: After a trying rookie race in the Yukon Quest, Nathaniel Hamlyn and his team are back for more

“I’m going to try to keep the team together and happy — that’s my big goal.”

The Friends of McIntyre Creek community group wants a new park

Friends of McIntyre Creek asked Whitehorse City Council on Jan. 21 to… Continue reading

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

Judge dismisses Shelley Cuthbert’s defamation lawsuit after she fails to post $15k security

Cuthbert was not present in court during a brief hearing on Jan. 21

Weather cooperates for Yukon Cross Country Ski Championships

After being postponed a week, temperatures improved enough to allow racing on Jan. 19

Yukoner Michelle Phillips finishes fifth at Copper Basin 300

“So the trail was put in and then the temperatures dropped down to -40 C. It makes for a fast trail”

Editorial: Lessons learned from flushing $35 million

At multiple points in the saga of the Dawson wastewater facility someone could have stepped in

Commentary: A backwards step on saving energy

Cody Reaume Electricity demand is growing in the Yukon, but our regulator… Continue reading

Climate change training teaches youth

A four-day workshop takes place in Whitehorse this month

Most Read