(Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)

Man who sexually abused girls a good candidate for treatment, eventual release, psychiatrist says

Dr. Shabreham Lohrasbe is an expert witness in the dangerous offender hearing for the man

A man who pleaded guilty to sexually abusing 13 girls over seven years appears to have genuine remorse for his crimes and would be a good candidate for treatment and eventual monitored release into the community, a psychiatrist testified this week.

Dr. Shabreham Lohrasbe, an expert witness in the ongoing dangerous offender application hearing for the man, made his assertion while being questioned by the man’s lawyer, Vincent Larochelle, Feb. 15.

The man’s name is covered by a publication ban in order to protect the identity of his victims. He has pleaded guilty to 11 counts of sexual interference, eight charges of producing child pornography, three counts of possessing and accessing child pornography, three counts of voyeurism and two counts of sexual assault. His crimes, which took place in the Yukon, British Columbia and Ontario, spanned from 2008 to 2014 and were committed against girls age 14 or under.

The Crown is asking for the man to be designated a dangerous offender, which, under the Criminal Code of Canada, would give the court the option of giving the man an indeterminate sentence with no chance of parole for seven years.

However, under cross-examination by the defence, Lohrasbe, who interviewed the man last year, said indefinite incarceration in this case “makes no sense.”

Lohrasbe testified that, in both his interview and an interview with police in Delta, B.C., the man appears to have shown genuine shame and remorse for his crimes and also appears to be eager to get treatment.

Lohrasbe confirmed that while the man is a pedophile, he has “non-exclusive pedophilia,” meaning he is not solely aroused by children. He also confirmed that the risk of recidivism is greatly reduced after an offender goes through sentencing proceedings, as an offender ages, and if the offender is not a psychopath.

In general, Lohrasbe said, long-term incarceration does not help with preventing re-offending, but long-term supervision does. He agreed with Larochelle that, in his professional opinion, the man would benefit from high-intensity treatment and, eventually, risk-monitored release into the community.

The man would require that monitoring for the rest of his life, Lohrasbe said.

The hearing is expected to continue Feb. 26.

Contact Jackie Hong at jackie.hong@yukon-news.com

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