Local artists present 100 for 100 or less

If the wheels of a bicycle have ever reminded you of a pair of zeros, then the theme of the second annual Cadence Cycle Seasonal Gallery is fitting. This year's show, which opens this week at the Cadence bike shop, features 100 pieces of art from six Whitehorse artists, all selling for $100 or less.

If the wheels of a bicycle have ever reminded you of a pair of zeros, then the theme of the second annual Cadence Cycle Seasonal Gallery is fitting.

This year’s show, which opens this week at the Cadence bike shop, features 100 pieces of art from six Whitehorse artists, all selling for $100 or less.

“There’ll be a few bigger (more expensive) show pieces, but that’s mostly what they’ll be,” said curator and artist Nicole Bauberger.

Though most of the art has nothing to do with cycling, some of the pieces were created within the shop, which is partly used as a studio during the cycling off-season in the winter months.

It’s a show, but also a place to learn.

This year Bauberger is introducing a weekly course, How Paint Works, on using transparent and opaque paints. The course will take place Thursdays from 4 p.m to 6 p.m. at the shop and run until the end of the show with limited spots available.

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“It’s more of a hands-on, technical development of understanding how transparent and opaque paints work together, how they blend wet-and-wet on the canvas and how they layer in both oil and acrylic,” said Bauberger. “It’s for anyone who wants to expand their understanding of the technical aspects of how paint works.

“This isn’t something that’s taught at art schools, but it’s very useful.”

Bauberger will also host weekly drop-in classes in encaustic painting (painting with melted, coloured beeswax). All that is needed is $5 to cover the cost of the art supplies and, perhaps, a little inspiration.

“For artists under five, it’s good for them to have a grown-up assistant to do things like handle the heat gun,” said Bauberger.

If you have visited the Yukon Art Centre recently, you have probably seen Bauberger’s work. She currently has a solo show there called Get There From Here with more than 180 pieces displayed. The show is of scenic paintings, completed on road-trips every 50-kilometres between Ontario and Whitehorse and beyond.

“I have quite a few pieces (at Cadence) where I’m experimenting with something new, so they don’t fit in with my more polished body of work,” said Bauberger.

The other artists include sculptor Sandra Grace Storey, painters Belinda Harrow and Linda Leon and “upcycle” artist Jessica Veelenga.

“She uses upcycled materials a lot. That means she goes and finds vintage pieces of lace, or embroidery or other found bits and turns them into jewelry and other fashion accessories,” said Bauberger.

“A sculpture is usually something well past the $100 price point, so it’s pretty special that (Storey) is making little pieces that will fit in with the concept of the seasonal gallery,” she added.

Artist Philippe LeBlond adds a whole different dimension to the show. LeBlond gained notoriety this past summer with his five-metre-in-diameter dome made from bicycle rims on his front yard.

For the show, LeBlond is presenting sheet-metal ravens made from recycled refrigerators and clocks made from old computer circuit boards.

“He has a kind of mad-scientist streak to his artistry, which is delightful and fabulously imaginative,” said Bauberger.

The show begins with a reception Thursday at 5 to 8 p.m. After that, the gallery will be open Wednesday to Friday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 508 Wood Street. The show runs until December 23.

Cadence Cycle will remain open during those same hours.

Contact Tom Patrick at

tomp@yukon-news.com

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