Patrick Yalloway gases up a vehicle at Integra Tire in Whitehorse on Jan. 24. In a statement released Aug. 29, the Yukon government announced how the most recently doled out gas tax money from the federal government will be divvied up around the territory. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)

Gas tax funding comes to the territory

Officials set out how much will go to communities

The Yukon government has announced how the most recently doled out gas tax money from the federal government will be divvied up around the territory.

In a statement released Aug. 29, Yukon government officials said the territory has received the first of two $8.25-million payments coming for this fiscal year along with a $16.5 million top up. It’s expected the other $8.25 million infusion will come early in the new year.

The top up is the territory’s share of a larger $2.2 billion increase to gas tax funding being spread across the country this year ahead of the October federal election.

“The investments that Yukon municipalities make with Gas Tax Funds help build and revitalize local public infrastructure while supporting economic growth, a clean environment, and strong communities,” Association of Yukon Communities president Tara Wheeler said in a statement.

“The fund provides our municipalities with predictable, flexible, long term funding and communities can make much needed investments across 18 different project categories. We were very pleased to see the doubling of the Gas Tax Fund allocations and would love to see it become permanent.”

Past gas tax funded projects have included upgrades to the City of Whitehorse water system, a new concession building in Dawon’s Minto Park after the previous one was destroyed by fire; and a new septic pump truck for Kluane First Nation among many more.

In an interview Aug. 29, Yukon Department of Community Services spokesperson Bonnie Venton Ross said it will be up to communities to decide how to best spend the money, provided the projects are within the criteria for gas tax funding.

The City of Whitehorse will receive the largest amount at $15.8 million in total including the top up and standard gas tax funding.

White River First Nation will receive the smallest amount totaling $282,342.

In between are: $333,308 to the Kluane First Nation; $409,354 for the Ta’an Kwä’ch’än Council; $472,884 each for the Village of Carmacks, Town of Faro, Village of Mayo and Village of Teslin; $478,000 for the Ross River Dena Council; $485,400 for the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyäk Dun; $519,378 for the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation; $589,762 for the Carcross/Tagish First Nation; $622,122 for the Teslin Tlingit Council; $639,110 for the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation; $356,769 for the Kwanlin Dün First Nation; $713,538 for Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in First Nation; $820,326 for the Liard First Nation; $917,406 for the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations; $945,986 for the Village of Haines Junction; and $1.6 million each for the City of Dawson and Town of Watson Lake.

Finally a total of $1.2 million has been set aside for projects in unincorporated communities.

Contact Stephanie Waddell at stephanie.waddell@yukon-news.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Motorcyclist, car passenger dead after crash on Alaska Highway near blue bridge

Motorcycle rider, 43, from Whitehorse and car passenger, 47, from Manitoba pronounced dead at scene

In Portals, artist Dee Bailey finds safety, comfort in whimsical landscapes

The exhibition opened at Arts Underground on July 3

Rezoning process of industrial lot starts

Public hearing scheduled for July 27

Yukon River Chinook run not as disastrous as feared, but still small

This year’s Yukon River Chinook salmon run isn’t as disastrous as originally… Continue reading

New contract approved for landfill management

Norcope Construction Group will be responsible for “daily operations” at the landfill

Today’s mailbox: COVID reopening

Letter to the editor published July 3

Vuntut Gwitchin councillor submits resignation

Vuntut Gwitchin councillor Cheryl Charlie has submitted her resignation, leaving Chief Dana… Continue reading

City hall, briefly

A look at decisions made by Whitehorse city council this week

Ancient lake bed sediments, unusual plants are markers of the Takhini salt flats

It’s one of the Yukon’s best open geological secrets, a well-known but… Continue reading

Yukon University hires director of finance

Yukon University announced in a press release on June 29 that Sheila… Continue reading

Diamond Tooth Gerties to reopen

The Klondike Visitors Association (KVA) announced in a press release on June… Continue reading

Newly-elected Liard First Nation chief accuses YG of interfering with election

Stephen Charlie says YG’s announcement days before election endorsed previous chief

Most Read