Parsons Inc., the same company that is in charge of care and maintenance at the Faro mine site, has been awarded the $80 million construction management contract until at least 2020. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)

Feds award $80M Faro construction manager contract

‘Finally, we are coming to a place where we can put the shovel in the ground’

The federal government has handed out an $80 million contract for a construction manager at the Faro mine site.

Parsons Inc., the same company that is in charge of care and maintenance at the site will now get the construction management contract until at least 2020. The deal also comes with two optional one-year extensions.

Parsons “will also be managing subcontracts and procurement using an approach that prioritizes Yukon and First Nation businesses and hires,” according to the press release.

In an email, Melissa Madden, a spokesperson for Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, said the funding agreement requires that work be divided into subcontracts for bidding by local companies.

Construction activities slated to be managed by Parsons include building the North Fork Rose Creek diversion, which will redirect the creek away from contamination on the site.

“Parsons Inc. will be tendering various work packages over the next few months to commence construction,” Madden said.

Parsons is required to structure work packages and sub-contracts to maximize opportunities for northern and Indigenous businesses, she said.

Certain projects will be set aside specifically for aboriginal businesses. In other cases bidders must outline “how they will maximize local involvement in the project, and must meet a target percentage for Indigenous employment,” she said.

“They must also outline training plans for Indigenous employees. Successful bidders must meet or exceed their commitments or face financial penalties.”

In a statement Ross River Dena Council Chief Jack Caesar said he was pleased that the First Nation was involved in the procurement process to find Parsons.

“Finally, we are coming to a place where we can put the shovel in the ground and start the important remediation process,” Caesar said.

“These are exciting times: working with Canada, Yukon government and the new interim construction manager, Parsons, we see something for our younger people to be excited about.”

The Faro mine was once the largest open pit lead-zinc mine in the world. When it shut down in 1998, 70 million tonnes of tailings and 320 million tonnes of waste rock were left behind, draining metals and acids into the water and land.

The federal government is paying for the care and maintenance as well as the eventual clean-up. Last June officials estimated that the final bill would be half a billion dollars on top of what has already been spent.

A remediation plan with full regulatory approval is expected by 2021, according to the federal government. The major construction phase would start in 2022 and is expected to last 15 years.

Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

Faromining

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Members of the RCMP’s traffic services team examine police markers on Range Road after a six-year-old boy was struck by a vehicle near the Takhini Arena in Whitehorse on Oct. 25. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)
Six-year-old hit by vehicle near Takhini Arena

Police were called to the scene around 12:15 p.m. on Oct. 25

Dr. Brendan Hanley, Yukon’s chief medical officer of health, speaks to media at a press conference about COVID-19 in Whitehorse on March 30. Two new cases of COVID-19 were identified in Watson Lake over the weekend. The cases are connected to three others in the community previously announced by officials on Oct. 23. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Two additional COVID-19 cases in Watson Lake bring total up to five

Individuals with symptoms and connections to the three other cases were tested over the weekend

Dr. Brendan Hanley, Yukon’s chief medical officer of health, speaks to media at a press conference about COVID-19 in Whitehorse on March 30. The Yukon government announced three new cases of COVID-19 in Watson Lake on Oct. 23. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Three new COVID-19 cases identified in Watson Lake

The Yukon government has identified three locations in town where public exposure may have occurred

Teagan Wiebe, left, and Amie Wiebe pose for a photo with props during The Guild’s haunted house dress rehearsal on Oct. 23. The Heart of Riverdale Community Centre will be hosting its second annual Halloween haunted house on Oct. 30 and 31, with this year’s theme being a plague. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Plague-themed haunted house to take over Heart of Riverdale for Halloween

A plague will be descending upon the Heart of Riverdale Community Centre… Continue reading

The Yukon government is asking for all claims in a lawsuit over the Takhini elk herd be struck by the court. (Mike Thomas/Yukon News file)
Yukon government asks for Takhini elk lawsuit to be struck

The Yukon government is asking for all claims in a lawsuit over… Continue reading

The Yukon government has filed a reply to an outfitter’s petition challenging the reduction of its caribou quota to zero. (Yukon News file)
YG replies to outfitter’s legal challenge over caribou quota

The Yukon government has filed a reply to an outfitter’s petition challenging… Continue reading

The Yukon government is encouraging people to get the flu vaccine this year, saying that with COVID-19, it’s “more important than ever.” (Black Press file)
Get flu vaccine, Yukon government urges

The Yukon government is encouraging people to get the flu vaccine this… Continue reading

Benjamin Munn, 12, watches the HPV vaccine in 2013. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine will be available to all Yukoners up to, and including, age 26. Currently the program is only available to girls ages nine to 18 and boys ages nine to 14. (Dan Bates/Black Press file)
HPV vaccine will be available to Yukoners up to, including, age 26

Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine will be available… Continue reading

Whitehorse City Hall. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
City hall, briefly

A look at decisions made by Whitehorse city council this week

asdf
COMMENTARY: Me and systemic racism

The view from a place of privilege

asdf
Today’s mailbox: Electricity and air travel

Letters to the editor published Oct. 23, 2020

Yukonomist Keith Halliday
Yukonomist: Irony versus Climate

Lately it seems like Irony has taken over as Editor-in-Chief at media… Continue reading