The fine for failing to stop for a school bus that’s dropping off passengers or unlawfully pass the vehicle will be $500, an increase of $300, and the number of demerit points is increasing from five to eight. (Ian Stewart/Yukon News file)

Drivers will be hit with bigger fines if they don’t stop for school buses

The amendments became effective on Mar. 4

Bad driving around school buses will be met with stiffer penalties now that the Yukon government has made amendments to the territory’s laws.

Those who don’t stop for a school bus that’s dropping off passengers or unlawfully pass the vehicle will be charged $500, an increase of $300. Demerit points have been raised to eight from five.

The changes came into effect on Mar. 4.

“We’ve seen the community express its anger at this really shoddy driving that endanger our most precious members of our society – children,” said Richard Mostyn, minister of highways and public works.

A second offence over a two-year period, he noted, will result in a one-month license suspension.

Mostyn said that he and Justice Minister Tracy-Anne McPhee ramped up fines as far as they could go under the existing legislation, a “byzantine” piece that is currently being given a facelift.

“It’s woefully out-of-sync with the times and has been neglected for many, many years,” he said. “We’ve committed to rewriting that entire act. It’s a massive undertaking and it’s currently underway.”

There have been several incidents involving school buses of late, which, as reported by the News, have caused public outcry.

In early December, a school bus was hit in Marsh Lake. Another was clipped by a transport truck on Jan. 16, which sent a 12-year-old to the hospital as a precaution.

Mostyn called bad driving around school buses “unacceptable.” To get this across means bumping up “scoff laws for people who flout the laws of the territory.”

“We wanted to send a message that people have to be sharper with their driving … You choose to pass a school bus, you’re choosing to endanger the life of a child or another driver.”

Contact Julien Gignac at julien.gignac@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Wood Street Ramen serves up Asian-inspired cuisine with local twist

Whitehorse’s newest restaurant opened its doors on March 13.

Federal and Yukon governments earmark $60 million over 10 years for housing

Yukon MP Larry Bagnell, Health and Social Services Minister Pauline Frost made announcement March 14

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation cries foul, says U.S. didn’t consult over possible ANWR development

The First Nation sent its submission to the Bureau of Land Management on March 13

Cook Street property owners could be charged for road and water improvements

Whitehorse City Council is considering a local improvement charge

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

Yukoner Ed Hopkins wins 2019 Iditarod rookie of the year

Hopkins was the top Canadian musher in the field, finishing 21st

Martine LeLevier repeats as Granger Grind champion

LeLevier won this year’s race with a time of seven hours, 57 minutes and 53 seconds

Driving with Jens: Spring forward with your clocks and vehicle

Each spring when you move your clocks ahead an hour for daylight… Continue reading

Commentary: Do endangered species endanger industries?

CPAWS Yukon campaigns coordinator Malkolm Boothroyd says the Yukon needs species at risk legislation

Yukonomist: Skookum versus Hygge

Back before Christmas, I wrote a column whinging that our wily winter-tourism… Continue reading

Minor hockey takes over Whitehorse rinks for a year end tournament

Two dozen teams were on the ice for one final chance to win bragging rights for the offseason

Calgary black belt holds Brazilian jiu-jitsu seminar in Whitehorse

Josh Russell held a two-day seminar hosted by Elite Martial Arts Academy and Judo Yukon

History Hunter: Two little girls linked to a tragic tale

The amazing story of two girls who lived in Dawson in the early days.

Most Read