Dawson residents oppose Dome Road reroute

Dawson City residents have appealed the town's decision to grant a permit to move a section of the Dome Road.

Dawson City residents have appealed the town’s decision to grant a permit to move a section of the Dome Road.

Two dozen residents submitted letters appealing the decision to the town’s mayor and council, and there was a public hearing on Wednesday evening.

The Yukon government wants to move a section of the road so a miner can access gold he has claim to underneath. Once the area is mined out, the government will be able to go ahead with a residential lot development it has been planning in the area for more than five years.

The government says the project will also improve road safety.

But some local residents say the government shouldn’t be subsidizing mining in the area, and that more planning and discussion is needed.

“In its proposal, and its actions to date, YTG is effectively telling council and residents that the right to mine is more important than the right of to govern,” said resident Jim Taggart in a news release. “That is unacceptable and can’t be allowed to continue. These circumstances are the perfect storm around which to finally resolve the issues of municipal authority and mining within municipalities. Council must take a stand and fight for its and residents’ rights.”

The claims in question are owned by Darrell Carey.

He bought the Slinky claims in 1998, after Dawson’s municipal boundary was extended to include the Dome area.

Since then, his efforts to pull placer gold from the ground have put him in conflict with the town of Dawson and Dome Road residents.

The claims are adjacent to, and in some cases overlap, properties in a 74-lot subdivision. Local residents have complained that the mine operations are disruptive and pose a threat to their safety and property values.

In 2009 the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board recommended that Carey’s placer mining licence not be renewed because of those potential adverse effects. But Energy, Mines and Resources went against that recommendation and renewed the mining permits anyhow.

In 2012 Yukon Supreme Court found that Carey owed the city more than $28,000 for clearing trees and excavating gravel too close to the road, in breach of his mining permit.

The town had argued that the work was not only in breach of the licence, but made the road unsafe for motorists.

Carey’s excavations “pose significant hazards to, and unreasonably interfere with, the integrity of the Dome Road,” said the statement of claim.

According to an information package prepared by City of Dawson staff, the plan to reroute the Dome Road around the claims is the result of many months of consultation between the town, the territory and the miner.

City administration believes that mining activity in the area will be prolonged if the reroute is not permitted, according to the document.

City council will make a decision about the appeal in the coming weeks.

Contact Jacqueline Ronson at

jronson@yukon-news.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley gives a COVID-19 update during a press conference in Whitehorse on May 26. The Yukon government announced two new cases of COVID-19 in the territory with a press release on Oct. 19. (Alistair Maitland Photography)
Two new cases of COVID-19 announced in Yukon

Contact tracing is complete and YG says there is no increased risk to the public

Yukon Energy in Whitehorse on April 8. Yukon Energy faced a potential “critical” fuel shortage in January due to an avalanche blocking a shipping route from Skagway to the Yukon, according to an email obtained by the Yukon Party and questioned in the legislature on Oct. 14. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Yukon Energy faced ‘critical’ fuel shortage last January due to avalanche

An email obtained by the Yukon Party showed energy officials were concerned

Jeanie McLean (formerly Dendys), the minister responsible for the Women’s Directorate speaks during legislative assembly in Whitehorse on Nov. 27, 2017. “Our government is proud to be supporting Yukon’s grassroots organizations and First Nation governments in this critical work,” said McLean of the $175,000 from the Yukon government awarded to four community-based projects aimed at preventing violence against Indigenous women. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Yukon government gives $175k to projects aimed at preventing violence against Indigenous women

Four projects were supported via the Prevention of Violence against Aboriginal Women Fund

Yukonomist Keith Halliday
Yukonomist: You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone

When I was a kid, CP Air had a monopoly on flights… Continue reading

asdf
EDITORIAL: Don’t let the City of Whitehorse distract you

A little over two weeks after Whitehorse city council voted to give… Continue reading

Whitehorse City Hall. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
City hall, briefly

A look at decisions made by Whitehorse city council this week

Northwestel has released the proposed prices for its unlimited plans. Unlimited internet in Whitehorse and Carcross could cost users between $160.95 and $249.95 per month depending on their choice of package. (Yukon News file)
Unlimited internet options outlined

Will require CRTC approval before Northwestel makes them available

Legislative assembly on the last day of the fall sitting in Whitehorse. Yukon’s territorial government will sit for 45 days this sitting instead of 30 days to make up for lost time caused by COVID-19 in the spring. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Legislative assembly sitting extended

Yukon’s territorial government will sit for 45 days this sitting. The extension… Continue reading

asdf
Today’s mailbox: Mad about MAD

Letters to the editor published Oct. 16, 2020

Alkan Air hangar in Whitehorse. Alkan Air has filed its response to a lawsuit over a 2019 plane crash that killed a Vancouver geologist on board, denying that there was any negligence on its part or the pilot’s. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Alkan Air responds to lawsuit over 2019 crash denying negligence, liability

Airline filed statement of defence Oct. 7 to lawsuit by spouse of geologist killed in crash

Whitehorse city council members voted Oct. 13 to decline an increase to their base salaries that was set to be made on Jan. 1. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Council declines increased wages for 2021

Members will not have wages adjusted for CPI

A vehicle is seen along Mount Sima Road in Whitehorse on May 12. At its Oct. 13 meeting, Whitehorse city council approved the third reading for two separate bylaws that will allow the land sale and transfer agreements of city-owned land — a 127-square-metre piece next to 75 Ortona Ave. and 1.02 hectares of property behind three lots on Mount Sima Road. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Whitehorse properties could soon expand

Land sale agreements approved by council

Most Read