Carcross/Tagish First Nation chief Khà Shâde Héni Andy Carvill has been accused of sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a CBC report, and could be dismissed from his position as a result. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)

Chief of Carcross/Tagish First Nation accused of sexual harassment: report

Documents leaked to CBC say Chief Andy Carvill could be dismissed at Jan. 26 general council meeting

The chief of Carcross/Tagish First Nation (C/TFN) has been accused of sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a CBC report, and could be dismissed from his position as a result.

According to a story published Jan. 8, internal documents leaked to the CBC allege that Khà Shâde Héni Andy Carvill made an “inappropriate comment” to a First Nation staff member, who informally complained about the harassment to a colleague.

According to CBC, the documents say Carvill, who was elected to his position in May 2016, has admitted to the sexual harassment and apologized to the complainant, who accepted the apology.

The News has not been able to obtain or view copies of any of the documents leaked to CBC.

The matter will be put to C/TFN’s general council at a meeting on Jan. 26.

The general council is C/TFN’s main governing body, according to the First Nation’s website, and is made up of 18 members, with each of C/TFN’s six clans appointing three representatives, including one elder, to the body.

Its mandate includes “development and implementation of laws and regulations,” providing a “forum for Citizens to voice their concerns and opinions,” and making “decisions about C/TFN laws and procedures.”

At least two resolutions will be put to the council to consider at the Jan. 26 meeting, the CBC reported — one calling for Carvill’s “immediate dismissal,” and the other allowing Carvill to remain chief, but asking him to “repay any legal fees incurred by the First Nation.”

According to a briefing note from C/TFN’s executive council, made up of nine members including Carvill, to general council, C/TFN’s legal costs have been “significant.”

Executive council decided on a course of action based on the First Nation’s personnel policy, case law and “legal opinion,” the note says, the last of which cost “several thousand dollars.”

As well, the note says C/TFN’s executive council “has authorized settlement discussions” with the complainant “up to an amount of $15,000,” CBC reported, with Carvill agreeing to pay “any fees.”

The note also says that the colleague the complainant informally spoke to about the harassment and a third staffer were reprimanded for “breach of confidentiality,” the CBC said, although it’s unclear what the breaches were.

Carvill did not respond to the News’ request for comment.

The First Nation’s acting governance manager, Maxine Benoit also did not respond to emails or phone calls before press time.

The News left a voicemail and sent an email to C/TFN’s communications coordinator, Daphné Pelletier Vernier, on Jan. 8 asking for confirmation on a number of details, including whether the general council was indeed meeting on Jan. 26.

In an emailed response Jan. 9, Pelletier wrote that the First Nation “will not provide any comments at this point.”

Contact Jackie Hong at jackie.hong@yukon-news.com

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