Shrubbery and housing construction surround the Whistle Bend entrance sign in Whitehorse on July 17, 2018. Whitehorse city council formally approved zoning for the final planned stage of the Whistle Bend neighbourhood at its July 22 meeting. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)

90 more lots zoned for Whistle Bend

The zoning for Phase 7 passed its final readings

Whitehorse city council formally approved zoning for the final planned stage of the Whistle Bend neighbourhood at its July 22 meeting.

Council members voted in favour of second and third readings of the bylaw that will allow for 90 residential lots zoned for larger single detached and duplex homes.

Coun. Steve Roddick highlighted the role opening lots could have in helping alleviate the pressure on housing in the city.

He said he does not want the opening of lots to be the sole focus of the city to deal with the housing issue. Development incentives, zoning changes and regulatory tools were among the additional tools he named to address the matter.

“Balanced growth in housing supply can not be achieved solely by increasing supply,” he said. “Even the staunchest advocates of supply-driven policy acknowledge that additional government intervention is critical to ensuring that economically-diverse housing stock is available for communities.”

Along with the 90 residential lots, Phase 7 of Whistle Bend will also feature a large greenbelt placed over the sewer main.

A defining feature of the area, the neighborhood’s perimeter trail will also continue through Phase 7.

Actual development is still four years away. Those lots aren’t expected to hit the market until 2023.

The next lottery for Whistle Bend lots is scheduled to happen later in July or in August for about 200 lots in the final part of Phase 3 and a portion of Phase 4 with another lottery for an additional 200 Phase 4 lots expected in September or October.

Officials with the Yukon government, which is the developer of the neighbourhood, have also indicated a commercial lot release in Whistle Bend will happen in the next year.

Phases 5 and 6 will be developed with those lots available over the next two years. Phase 7 will come after that.

While Phase 7 represents the last phase of planned development for Whistle Bend, officials with the Yukon government, city and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council (which has settlement land in the area) are working on future plans for the few remaining portions of the neighbourhood not yet planned.

The city is also in the midst of drafting a new Official Community Plan, which will explore the next site for major development in Whitehorse after Whistle Bend is built out.

Contact Stephanie Waddell at stephanie.waddell@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

UPDATED: Porter Creek highway shooting now attempted murder investigation

Police believe incident was “targeted and related to the illicit drug trade and organized crime”

Inuvik mayor pens letter of concern about Dempster conditions

Conditions near Eagle Plains have been “terrible” the past two summers, she says

Yukon skiers embrace experience at Winter Youth Olympic Games

Derek Deuling and Sasha Masson skied for Team Canada at the 2020 Lausanne Winter Youth Olympic Games

‘It was terribly traumatic to lose a patient,’ nurse says during Blackjack inquest

The inquest is now happening at the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre

Whitehorse council and staff consider low-income transit fares

The discussion leaves anti-poverty coalition members feeling optimistic

Today’s mailbox: Biomass, fire

Letters to the editor published Jan. 24

EDITORIAL: The health department needs a time-out

The information and privacy commissioner deserves to be treated better

Yukon Rivermen face tough tests on the road

The team is in the middle of its busiest stretch of the season — 10 league games in three weeks

Yukon skiers battle both rain and heavy snowfall at 2020 Haywood Western Canada Cup

“They also realize that you have to be ready for anything — extreme cold or extreme warm.”

City news, briefly

Some of the discussions from Whitehorse city council on Jan 20

Driving with Jens: Both motorists and pedestrians have responsibilities when sharing the road

Roadways are a shared-use public resource. They are meant to be shared… Continue reading

Today’s mailbox: Biomass

Letters to the editor published Jan. 17

Most Read