For those planning a spring painting project, the Home Hardware Building Centre’s Scott Lillies shares what you need to know to get the job done right!

The smart way to colour your home beautiful this spring!

From proper prep to the right paint, the local experts share what you need to know

Is painting on your to-do list?

You’re in luck! Just in time for your spring projects, the Home Hardware Building Centre – Whitehorse has added General Paint to its extensive paint department offerings, which also includes Beauti-Tone, Benjamin Moore, and other specialty products.

Home Hardware’s Scott Lillies first began working with the product in the 1970s and ’80s and is happy to see it on local shelves. “It’s a good product and with a longstanding company behind the brand, homeowners feel confident using it for their home and garden projects.”

Of course, there’s more to a great paint job than quality paint, but no matter how you’d like to spruce up your home this spring and summer, you’ll find the tools – and know-how – here!

“When it comes to painting, your finished product will only be as good as your prep,” Lillies says.

And it’s good advice. After all, Lillies knows paint!

To get you started, we tapped into his expertise:

1. Prep, prep, prep! We can’t say it enough – your finished product will only be as good as the preparation. Begin by cleaning with TSP, then rinsing with water. Flaking paint or stain should also be sanded smooth. Both steps will help ensure the new paint adheres to the original surface, Lillies explains. “If you don’t prep, you won’t get the finish you want.” Next, choose a quality painter’s tape to protect baseboards, ceilings, windows, trim and other details. It might seem like a chore but will make the painting go quicker and mean fewer touch-ups.

2. Surface solutions: Before applying your new colour, you may first need to determine what kind of product is there now – oil-based paint or latex. Rub a test spot with a cotton ball soaked with nail polish remover. If the paint comes off, it’s latex and you’re good to go. If it stays put, it’s likely an oil paint that will require priming first. If you’re working with wood, try a light sanding with 80-grit paper to remove the mill glaze and help ensure a smoother finish.

3. Brand new base? If you’re painting bare drywall, start with a primer coat. A bare surface will soak up a lot more of your top coat and create an uneven finish. (You’ll also save money in the long run as primer is less expensive than paint.)

4. Cover up smart: Among the common mishaps Lillies has seen in his years at the paint counter is skipping the primer when changing from a darker colour to a lighter one. Primer will help cover that burgundy feature wall and allow your cheery yellow to show its true colours.

5. Don’t rush it: A little sunshine and warmer temperatures can tease us into those outdoor projects early, but for exterior painting or staining, be sure to wait for the thermometer to reach 10°C, Lillies advises. Inside, you’re good to go.

For everything you need to make your spring painting project a success, visit Scott and the Home Hardware team at 2281 Second Ave today, and check out all their products in store or online.

Renovations

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