More contractors are choosing the home comforts of Mayo Cabin Rentals, self-contained rentals with a full kitchen, bedding, furniture, living room and more.

Road-weary contractors find genuine home comfort in Mayo cabins

For a long stay or a short one, you can ‘just move in’

If your job takes you on the road, you know that work travel is not the same as holiday travel. Hotels and restaurants have their charms, but the road routine gets old fast.

Imagine having a house to yourself – for a short stay or extended contract work, it’s the difference between staying somewhere and living there.

In Mayo, more and more contractors are choosing the home comfort of Mayo Cabin Rentals.

“They’re suited very well for contractors because each cabin is self-contained,” said Mayo Cabin Rentals owner Laura Erickson. “And it has everything that you would have in your house, like a full kitchen and all the bedding, the furniture, living room, dining room.

“People just need their clothes and their food, and they just move in. There’s also a washer and dryer in each cabin – which is nice, because it’s hard to get to the laundromat when you’re working,” she said.

If you don’t feel like cooking after a day’s work, the cabins are only four kilometres from Mayo. But if you’re weary of restaurant food, or you’re working past closing time, it’s great to be able to cook for yourself – even barbecue your own steak or burgers right at your cabin.

While you enjoy peace and quiet and complete privacy, Erickson says you can also expect a high level of service. Cabins are cleaned and towels and bedding replaced, as you would expect from any good accommodation provider.

Erickson is also your guide to Mayo and your local fixer when you have questions or problems to solve. She knows where you can get the services you need.

“If people lock themselves out of their vehicle or they need a mechanic and don’t know who to call, if they need things or have questions, I can be their go-to person for Mayo,” she says.

“But mainly people just come to work, and they basically like having a quiet place to come home to when they’re done the job for the day.

“And it’s super quiet.”

The cabins are easy to get to and from the airport or the highway. Two of them are well set up to accommodate two people or a small family, and the other one is essentially a “single,” with one double bed. All of the cabins are fully winterized with electric and wood heat.

“They really are small houses, with all the amenities of a house,” Erickson said.

Mayo Cabin Rentals is located in the Airport subdivision, an area Erickson describes as “rural residential.” There are neighbours close by, but you’re not in a townlike setting. And Erickson is “just a 30-second bike ride away.”

“Each cabin is really private,” she says. “They’re on the same property, but they’re staggered so when you’re on your porch, you can’t see anybody and they can’t see you.”

For road-weary contractors, it’s a great setup.

“You don’t need to do anything except just live there,” Erickson said.

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