Tait Trailers has been delivering quality trailers throughout the Yukon and Alaska since 1999, and they do it at prices comparable to those you’ll find down south, says Russ Tait.

Here’s how to get the trailer you need – and want

Local knowledge and service doesn’t need to come at a premium price

Whether you’re hauling a car, snowmobile, construction equipment or any other worldly possession, you want to be sure your trailer is built for Yukon conditions.

But that doesn’t mean it needs to be more expensive than trailers you’ll find down south.

“Our focus has always been on long-term quality, versus short-term savings. I’d much rather sell you something that’s going to last,” says Russ Tait, from Tait Trailers, pointing to the company motto: “Quality Behind You All The Way.”

Having developed relationships with a variety of quality manufactures, Tait Trailers has been delivering quality trailers throughout the Yukon and Alaska since 1999, and they do it at prices comparable to those you’ll find down south.

“We have customers who are still using trailers they purchased from us in 1999,” Tait notes.

How can you make sure you’re getting the trailer you need?

  1. Take the time you need – In addition to understanding where and in what conditions your trailer will be operating – another great reason to shop locally – when choosing a trailer, it’s important to get one that will work for your needs. “We spend a lot of time with our customers to make sure they get the best equipment that will work for what they need to haul,” Tait says. At Tait’s, you can choose from standard units or custom-built designs specifically for your needs.
  2. The price you want – Quality doesn’t need to cost more. “Here in the Yukon, freight is always a big factor, so we try to keep our trailers the same price as down south,” Tait says.
  3. After-sale service – When you’re investing in a quality trailer that you’ll trust to some of your most valuable belongings, you want to know that any questions you have will be promptly answered. That’s where a trusted local company offers added value. “All of our manufacturers have been in the business a long time and they have the same principles as we do,” Tait says. “If our customers have any questions or concerns, we’ll help them find solutions.”

Ready to learn more? Visit online at taittrailers.com or call Russ anytime at 867-334-2194.

In addition to selling and delivering trailers, Tait’s also sells office and job site trailers, custom service bodies, truck decks, sled decks, snow plows, custom truck bumpers, custom rack systems and chainsaw winches. Tait’s also has an extensive rental fleet.

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