Mock emergency promotes real talk

Students from Ross River and Faro recently got a first-hand look at the first responders who come to the rescue in an emergency.

Students from Ross River and Faro recently got a first-hand look at the first responders who come to the rescue in an emergency.

A mock car crash was set up in Faro last Friday as part of the Prevent Alcohol and Risk Related Trauma in Youth (P.A.R.T.Y.) program.

Using students as actors in each of the vehicles, the scene was set up to mimic a collision where a van of innocent passengers was struck by a car driven by an impaired driver.

About two dozen students from Grades 6 to 12 watched as police, fire, EMS — and eventually the coroner — arrived on scene.

It was as realistic a scene as possible. The firefighters used extraction tools to peel doors off. Students playing trapped victims — complete with fake blood — were brought out of the vehicles and into an ambulance. One passenger was placed into a body bag.

The scenario was part of a day-long event teaching students about the importance of their choices. They hear from RCMP officers, EMS staff, firefighters and medical personnel about what is involved in an emergency rescue and how one bad decision can impact their lives and the lives of other people.

Students talk about texting while driving as well as impaired driving. The program is not about preaching at kids not to drink, it’s about helping them be more prepared when it comes time to make that decision.

“Thinking ahead, planning ahead,” said coordinator Don Livingstone. “’We’re going to go to a party tonight, who’s going to be our designated driver? Who’s going to make sure that our designated driver doesn’t drink? Or, if somebody is drinking, how can we get home?’”

The Yukon P.A.R.T.Y Program has been around since 2002. Livingstone has been running it for the last three years.

In the communities, where class sizes are smaller, the program is expanded to include younger grades so enough students can take part.

In Whitehorse, it is designed for Grade 9 and 10 students. There, students spend a day at the Whitehorse General Hospital following the path of an injury survivor from a crash to the hospital to rehabilitation, and sometimes death.

“We just want to help kids have a bigger bag of tricks to make good decisions,” Livingstone said.

Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Higher camping fees, new campground, reconciliation efforts feature in Yukon parks 10-year strategy

Creating a new campground within two hours of Whitehorse, introducing higher camping… Continue reading

YG and pharmacies preparing for flu vaccine distribution

The Yukon government is preparing for flu season and encouraging people to… Continue reading

Non-resident tests positive for COVID-19

The individual has been hospitalized in Whitehorse

Yukon working with B.C. on COVID-19 “mouth rinse” tests for children

The tests are easier for children than the comparatively uncomfortable nose swab

Throne speech promises COVID-19 support, childcare, internet upgrades

Yukon premier said he is “cautiously optimistic” about many commitments

Hot Hounds bikejor race serves as lone summer competition

Held in Mount Lorne, the race was organized by the Dog Powered Sports Association of the Yukon

Whitehorse operations building officially open

Staff are taking phased approach to moving in

North of Ordinary Experience Centre shutting down

COVID-19 has caused bookings for the space to become almost non-existent, owner says

Canada Games Centre could get new playground

Council to vote on contract award

City hall, briefly

A look at decisions made by Whitehorse city council this week

Harescramble brings out motorcycle community

This year’s event included 67 riders

YG seeks members for youth climate change panel

“Yukon youth deserve to have their voices heard”

Yukon NDP hold AGM

This year’s meeting was held virtually

Most Read