Zero energy, plenty of time

Zero energy, plenty of time It may be too late to install an innovative heating system for homes in the new Whistle Bend subdivision, but it is not too late to ensure that the thousands of new homes built there will not be a burden on our electric grid a

It may be too late to install an innovative heating system for homes in the new Whistle Bend subdivision, but it is not too late to ensure that the thousands of new homes built there will not be a burden on our electric grid and fuel supplies.

During this past winter, the local fuel supplier was almost running on fumes trying to keep up with the demand for diesel at Yukon Energy where they were burning one B-train (highway tanker truck) every two days at the Whitehorse facilities alone.

If we all look to the future and see the predicted decline in fossil fuel production, it would be foolish to allow any new building to be built without using the highest standards of construction available today as well as making provisions for renewable energy production.

Whistle Bend subdivision could be an excellent showcase of technology adapted to the North, such as passive house, a European method of building tailored to the unique conditions and climate of the building site.

With future or preferably immediate addition of renewables, the passive house could become a net zero or plus energy home resulting in no extra yearly demand for electricity from the grid. This would dovetail right into Yukon Electric’s decision to focus on demand side management as a way of solving the looming energy crunch in the Yukon.

Andy Lera

Whitehorse