Yukon Chamber of Commerce responds

Eldon Organ accuses the Yukon Chamber of Commerce of indulging in partisan politics because the Yukon Chamber is hosting a luncheon themed “Pros and Cons of Carbon Pricing” on Nov. 3, just a few days before the territorial election.

Eldon Organ accuses the Yukon Chamber of Commerce of indulging in partisan politics because the Yukon Chamber is hosting a luncheon themed “Pros and Cons of Carbon Pricing” on Nov. 3, just a few days before the territorial election.

The allegation of partisanship arises from what Mr. Organ feels to be an orchestrated pitting of David vs. Goliath, with kind, gentle local geological engineer and builder Forest Pearson (presenting a Yukon perspective in favour of carbon pricing) against mighty Paige MacPherson, a representative of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (presenting a national case against carbon pricing). Fearing that the discussion will be unbalanced, the letter implores the Yukon Chamber of Commerce to fix the situation.

We would like to acknowledge Mr. Organ’s concerns. The Yukon Chamber of Commerce is a devoutly non-partisan organization and has not taken a position on carbon pricing, nor will we prior to the election. Within our membership, we have champions both for and against carbon pricing. When the Yukon Chamber of Commerce takes a position on carbon pricing, it will be well-researched and approved by a resolution of our membership. For now, we want to foster constructive dialogue from a variety of perspectives and suspect others want the same.

When organizing this event we reached out to other national organizations such as the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and the Canadian Mining Association — both of which are in favour of carbon pricing — but we were unable to book either for the event. It is with our gratitude that Mr. Pearson is willing to share his local perspective on the topic. We’ve also invited all four territorial political parties to present their perspectives on carbon pricing, which, if they accept, brings the total number of perspectives being presented to six — a tremendous value for a $35 event that includes a delicious lunch.

If the aforementioned hasn’t allayed Mr. Organ’s concerns, he may take comfort in remembering that in the battle of David vs. Goliath, David won.

Michael Pealow Chair,

Yukon Chamber of Commerce

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