Storage Wars is a fundraiser without foreclosures

Storage Wars is a fundraiser without foreclosures Enough time has passed for me to realize that there seems to be some misconception by the public, friends and random acquaintances I've run in to that the Storage Wars event held at Titanium Way Storage P

Enough time has passed for me to realize that there seems to be some misconception by the public, friends and random acquaintances I’ve run in to that the Storage Wars event held at Titanium Way Storage Park last June was based on the premise of foreclosures, and that these foreclosures funded the event. “Just like on TV, right?” Wrong.

I feel I must clarify this misconception that came from the Aug. 2 Yukon News’s feature Business Environment article exhibiting Trotter’s young daughters as Whitehorse’s Mini Storage Czars. Although I am flattered that Titanium Storage was mentioned in pretty much every paragraph of the article, I was not flattered for the slant. At the same time I know enough about business to expect some competitive knocking around. All good – until I realized readers may not necessarily see through the transparency on important issues such as the Storage Wars event … hence the reason for this letter.

To start there was in no way foreclosures, as was implied in the article and believed by some readers. The mission for Titanium Storage is to provide personal and authentic service and to build and maintain personal relationships with customers in order to best meet individual needs. To date, less than a year later, there have not been any foreclosures and likely never will be.

Storage Wars was a fundraiser put on by the hospital foundation and funded by generous donations from both individuals and businesses. Titanium Storage donated both the venue and of course storage space. Titanium Storage provided a unique atmosphere for the hospital foundation to host a unique event from which they raised over $8,000.

Units auctioned comprised a diversity of items adding to the “funness” and hype of the event. Upon cutting the lock and opening the door of a unit, the crowd was allowed to peer inside for five minutes before Anthony Trombetta of CKRW started the bidding. Units contained anything from new windows, new tool sets, and car stereos to four hours of labour from the mayor and even a tax receipt disguised in the contents of a suitcase! It was great fun and certainly every bidder came away happy.

Titanium Storage is owned and operated by my partner Ricky Moses and myself. We both grew up in the small, northern township of Mayo and remain very connected to the Yukon communities including Whitehorse. We are both aware of and sensitive to the needs of the people of the Yukon and are proud to host amazingly loyal clients. Thank you patrons!

Josie Martin

Whitehorse