Sad about the beavers

Sad about the beavers I was sickened after reading your story about the beaver colony that lived behind the White Pass building being purposely destroyed. I cannot wrap my head around that. Is not Whitehorse called the wilderness city? One would think t

I was sickened after reading your story about the beaver colony that lived behind the White Pass building being purposely destroyed.

I cannot wrap my head around that. Is not Whitehorse called the wilderness city?

One would think the people in charge would have been aware of that, as they are there to protect our wildlife.

My husband and I walked on the path all summer long and a big part of our enjoyment was seeing what the busy little beavers had done the night before.

It is quite unforgivable that whoever ordered that destruction did not even give the matter a second thought.

Nancy Campbell says at the end of the article, “It’s not like we’ve done a terrible thing to the beaver population. These are not the only beavers in Whitehorse.”

I cannot even remark on that.

These beavers were enjoyed by many, many Yukoners and tourists alike.

Often, we would stop and talk with strangers and friends, always commenting on how industrious and family oriented these little creatures are.

It is cruel just to assume the beavers will starve to death under winter ice and do nothing.

Community Services did not do their homework.

“I don’t know, I’m not a beaver expert,” said Pat Molloy, after being asked if it would have made a difference whether the lodge was destroyed in March or November. His answer shows disdain for our wildlife population. Could he not have taken the time to call an expert?

At the very least those responsible should now call on an expert and find out how to feed and keep the beavers going until spring and then do the right thing.

After all, is not the beaver our national emblem?

People sitting in positions of power over our wildlife, making these life-and-death decisions, should, at the very least, find some compassion towards innocent creatures trying to survive in their own environment.

Donna Isaak

Whitehorse