Realtors versus wildlife

Realtors versus wildlife Re Takhini North isn't enough: realtors (News, February 5): Wildlife and a "handful of people" in this "wilderness city" appear to be a huge pain in the butt to the president of the Yukon Real Estate Association, Mike Racz. Rac

Re Takhini North isn’t enough: realtors (News, February 5):

Wildlife and a “handful of people” in this “wilderness city” appear to be a huge pain in the butt to the president of the Yukon Real Estate Association, Mike Racz.

Racz gave a perfect example why it is crucial to have (at the very least) a “handful of people” advocating to save as much natural area as possible. Racz views wildlife in Whitehorse as a huge obstacle in his quest for more houses to sell.

The interview with Racz states that a “moose path or a beaver trail or whatever” aren’t worth protecting, in his mind’s eye. In fact, he made it very clear by saying, “Unfortunately, this is a city. They want it to be a city? Then let’s keep animals out of the city and let people live in the city. The animals can walk around the corner.”

The “animals can walk around the corner”? What corner? Or do we put up detour signs for wildlife to obey, and charge them if they dare pass through McMansion neighbourhoods?

I want to thank Racz for stating his position with regards to wildlife and a “handful” of tree huggers, bleeding hearts and wildlife admirers. He gave a perfect example why some development needs to be challenged and stopped!

The inhumane treatment of wildlife is certainly not in line with Whitehorse’s image as a “wilderness city,” or the Yukon as a “larger than life” destination where people can enjoy nature. That said, I have often wondered when wolves, beavers and bears are shot or trapped and killed in Whitehorse for the convenience of urban development, why you never hear those who apparently represent this so-called “wilderness city” questioning the destruction of these animals?

Racz said that the city’s planning department “works like a bugger.” I have no doubt that they work very hard and they have good intentions, too. I had to wonder about the wisdom of his choice of the slang word “bugger,” though, as it could mean many things, and working hard isn’t one of them (look the word up).

Keep it natural Ð keep it valuable!

Mike Grieco

Whitehorse